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Full text of "Constitution and playing rules of the National league of professional base ball clubs"

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RULES FOR THE UMPIRES 



President Young Thinks the 

Rules of the Game Are 

All Sufficient. 



THE SUGGESTIONS Mi 



An Expression of What Experi- 
ence Has Taught About 
trie Great Game, 



DIGNITY EVER TO BE PRESERVED 



Firmness, with Courtesy, Is the West 
Policy for the Man Who Has to Con- 
trol a Game— Accuracy on Base Decis- 
ions Insisted on by President Young. 
Washington, April 21 .—President N. E. Young 
of the National League has reconsidered his de- 
tevmination not to issue the usual annual in- 
structions to umpires. He has prepared the fol- 
lowing amplifications of the rules and sugges- 
tions that naturally follow upon the experience 
of the past season, devoting special attention to 
the regulations for the preservation of good or- 
der and the elevation of the national game. The 
text of the instructions follows: 
To the Umpires nj tin ffatimud League: 

While the changes effected in theplavlng rules of 
the National League since the close of tho past season 
are in the main of a minor character, there are, 
nevertheless, a number of points to which I have 
deemed it ad visa'; :■■ to call your attention, chieriy 
with a view to obviating, as much as possible, the 
embarrassing situations in which the umpire fre- 
quently finds himself placed— situations in which 
prompt and tn1 action will often save to an 

umpire his i ril y in the section in which he 

may be working ana add materially to his usefulnes;- 

During the there was. perhaps, no point 

of play so vexing in the continued controversy occa- 
sioned by the inconsistent ruling of the several um- 
pires of the Stan" as the question as to what should 
constitute a correct position on the partof the pitcher. 
1 .im satisfied thai this trouble arose from lack of at- 
tention in th - to this very important 
provision. ?•: was frequently- called to the 
.and 1 took an early occasion to 
•y Instructions upon the point. It 
whs then too late, to entirely remedy the 
difficulty, and its bad effects were seen even in the 
closing garni a ..sun, when the question as to 
rrect position of a pitcher caused contention on 
the field and made repeated decisions of the umpire 
ary. 
Tie chief point I d is the individual pe- 
yof the T aerof the League, who 
last year was vli i u under 
-. The young twirlers who 
have come into the ranks of the leading clubs within 
a y< sr or so easily acquh code, bul there is 
to be a tendency on the part of the old men to 
b Into the easier and perhaps more effective 
Rtyle of delivery practiced by them before the draft- 
ing of the new rules. Umpires should observe closely 
ulation which provides that the pitcher l •shall 
right foot unless in the act of delivering 
at one step in such delivery. 1 ' 
The umpire should carefully note whether, in taking 
P< >it iun, the right foot (or left if the pitcher be left 
handed) is on the rear line of the b'>x, his left (or for- 
toot in front of the right, ana to the left of an 
imaginary line drawn from his right foot to the 
of the home base. In accordance with my sup- 
plementary instructions of last season I would say 
that tor convenience this Imaginary line niav be sup- 
to pass from the center of the home plate 
through the ball of the rear foot. 

fjo rule 7 a prohibition is found against the cap- 
tain or coacher leaving the coacher's line except open 
peal to the umpire. This regulation should be 
si rii t ly enforced by the Imposition of the fine provided 
Violation. A strict adherence to it will soeedily 
Btop the disreputable practice of some teachers, who, 
for the purpose of diseoncerting.the players of the op- 
_: side, run rapidly up the base path to give the 
impression that a runner is coming in from third. In 
this connection it is also necessary to observe the 
fourth section of rule 2*2, providing that no player of 
the side at bat, except when batsman, shall occupy 
portion of the space within the coacher's lines. 
rule should be strictly enforced. The umpire will 
fin 1 it to his own i to keep clear as much of 

I. the ground back ot the plate as poss provi- 

t U'u2 of tlu- .-ame rule is also important in 
connection, prohibiting other players than the 
ns and one assistant troni occupying the spaco 
•n the players' lines and the captains 3 lines. 
disputes may tints be obviated and the umpire 
may in a great measure pro If from the 

"bulldozing" methods still followed by certain 

pirea should remember that the provisions of 

•i*2, rule 13, v . ■ the game. 

Id be promptly furnished by the home club. 

hen but one or t v. o ;i i e in play the umpire w iil 

'land 
, ut m play i- member also that 

• oment t he urn pi re d i livers the ball to 

;■ pitcher it comes into play and shall not 
red until it in turn passes oui of sight or to 
foul ground*? 
1 et me re] hat I said last year with re- 

ting ripped or mishapen. In 
tug this provision, the question of degree 
• n Into consideration. , If the umpire 
hat the hall is not practically a perfect 
he should call for a new one. A ball not per- 
round will not take a true flight, nor will it 
tatural angle. The slightest deviation in 
sufficient cause for the eu- 
nent of this rule. Prompt decisions should be 
red in all those cases, as the point is too often 
raised dimply to cause delay in the game. 

Rule 13 provides that the un be the solo 

judge of play, and is entitled to the respect of the 
tors. Any person offering any insult or in- 
v to him mnsl be promptly ejected from the 
s will consult their own interests 
quite as ma of the game generally in 

rule; They should allow no 
questio olayers other than that pro- 

vided for in I rule 7, referring to "a misin- 

terpretation t I before, the in- 

tent of this n | on players is to bar ail ques- 

tions of fact. If the umpire renders a decision it must 
without comment from the players, unless the 
d shall deem that the umpire, in formulating 
his judgment of the pi;; . <mg construction 

the wiitten In 
it?houldbe remembered that the umpire is the solo 
. though In su 

uing captain . . fie umpire, no wever, Is 

the supreme authority on the interpretation of a rule 

I do not know that I can find a better place than 
ere to call your attention to the necessity of the 
accuracy in rend us. While 

spectators and several of the players in a con- 
test may form an opinion on the Question of a strike 
or called ball, very on to judge w Ith 

v, a fact which all fair 
minded spectators fully realize. On the other hand, 
there will hardly be found within the inclosure of a 
ball ground a man or boy who does not at once form a 
deeply rooted opinion upon every base decision that is 
made. The umpire Is cither right OT wrong, in his 
ttlon, and Is therefore efficient or Incompetent. 
Another point, in this connection, however, is of even 
more importance. When a player makes the run from 
first to second base there are certainly t wo men in the 
field who know whether tho umpire's decision is e<\ - 
reel or not— the base runner and the plavcr on scco nd 
base. If the umpire is wrong he is bound to suffer t n 
the estimation of tho players generally, and nothing 
Is more demoralizing to the game than to have it pro- 
ceed under the direction of an umpire in whose judg- 
ment the players have little or no confidence. 

L'mpires should avoid addressing the audience in ex- 
planation of decisions or points of play, except when 
absolutely necessary; Above all things, they should re- 
frain from replying to uncomplimentary remarks 
is frequently evoke trom excited 
Individuals during well contested games. 

Uule iO refers to tho condition under which a game 
shall be drawn, and upon these points I would like to 
as the minds of all mnpires with the necessity of 
impartiality. There is. perhaps, no in- 
cident in the whole summer's campaign as productive 
of dissatisfaction as the average game called on ac- 
coutred darkness. While it will be readily admitted 
- the sole judge as to whether the 
■S arrived when, in fairness to both sides, i ha 
game should be called, yet, as the crowd reluctantly 
.unds, there will be many grumblers 
ire satisfied In their own minds either that the 
no ight hare been played longer or that it should 
fiftve been called before. Of course no umpire, how- 
skilled or well disposed, can hope to satisfy 
everybody, but he should he particularly caref ul i& 
allow no consideration what* 
idgment. Kever mind who is afieadc 
le, all about the crisis of the game,. 
hen you are that the players of etcher 

side are at all handicapped by darkness call the game. 
It will he remembered that one of the most annoy- 
ing controversies of the : resulted upon an 
interpretation placed upon rule A3, which covers the 
Ion of substitute. Undti .age of this 
Is not allowed to take the place of 
Led in 
reasoa of dli 
of the nature or extent of which the umpire 
shall be the - 1 be quest ion l her a 

§■ i3 incapacitated by injury is rarely difficult to 
tine, but it in ter or 



not a player J bleof playing by rea- 

i oi illness, the evlden • b m: 



sou 

all apparent 

Judge of a 



„_ may v. 
While til-..- iir':iirn ]vi-si be I 

condition he should, however. 



ion a p! He the 

question of disability as , i u an 

-r "delays a.. 

1 in conclusion, let me repeat what 1 ".entry 

J written to umpires: A watchful eye and, aoove all 

things, a c mpiro 

1 . In o ugh the 

N. E. Yo i • x t : . i ' re sident National .League, 
W A 8 ii i-i a to n, April i.'Q. 



CONSTITUTION 



PLAYING RULES 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



PROFESSIONAL BASE BAiLL CLOBS. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION. 

Including the Proceedings of the League Congress held in New York, 

1887, and New York; 1888, and the Official Fielding and Batting 

Averages of Players in Championship Games in 1887. 



CHICAGO: 

PUBLISHED BY A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

108 Madison St., CHICAGO. 241 Broadway, NEW YORK. 

Copyrighted by A. G. Spalding £ Bros., i&SS, 



CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL GROOM/) 






4 







D 




,, CATCHER 

UMPIRE 



Catchers fenct 




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A. A, A. — Ground reserved for Umpire, Batsmtm and Catcher 

B. B. —Ground reserved for Captain and Assistant. 
C— Players' Bench. D.— Visiting Players* Bat Hack 
E. —Home Players' Bat Rack. 



INDE1X 



— TO THE — 



aOILTSTITTTTIOIN-. 



Section. 

Name i 

Objects.. 2 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Members for" 18S6 3 

Not More than One Club Member from any City 3 

Population of Eligible City 4 

Mode of Applying for Membership 5-6 

Election of Club Member 6 

Mode of Filling Vacancy in Club Membership. 7 

Dues, Assessments, Fines, Etc 8 

Guarantee Fund 9 

Termination of League Club Membership 10 

" '* Membership, How Enforced U 

Membership of Umpire, Manager or Player 12 

Disqualified Persons, Secretary's Record and Notice ... 13 

OFFICERS. 

President, Election and Duties of 14 

Board of Directors, Election of. 15 

Directors, Qualifications of , . . , * 16 

Board of Directors, Duties of 17 

" " '* Meetings of 18 

11 " " Reports of 19 

Proceedings of, not to be Disclosed. ... 20 

Filling Vacancy in 21 

Secretary, how Elected 22 

" to be Treasurer 23 

11 General Duties of 24 

M . to Record and Report Violations of Rules and 

Regulations 25 

Secretary, Salary and Guaranties 26 

(8) 



4 INDEX TO THE CONSTITUTION 

LEAGUE CLUB, UMPIRES, MANAGERS AND 
PLAYERS. 

Section. 

Club, Jurisdiction of its Affairs 27 

11 Territory 28 

Restriction as to Games 28 

Contract with Manager or Player 29 

Player not under Contract, what Games he May Play in. . . . 29 

Notice of Contract with Manager or Player 30 

Release from Contract, Notification of 31 

" " " Effect of 32 

When Manager or Player may Engage with Another Club. . 33 

When Manager <>r Haver Becomes Ineligible 34 

Clubs Forbidden to Employ Disqualified Persons 35 

M Play Clubs Employing Disqualified 

Persons - 36 

Manager or Player, when to Report Grievances 37 

" *' " Cause of Expulsion of. 38 

11 M " " " Suspension of 39 

Umpire, Cause of Disqualification of ... . 40 

The Umpire, how Appointed 41 

Umpire's Expulsion 42 

** Jurisdiction 43 

DISPUTES AND COMPLAINTS. 

Disputes between Clubs, how Adjudicated 44 

Complaint of Club against Manager or Player of another 

Club 45 

Complaint of Reserved Player against the Club Reserving 

llim 46 

Complaint of Player under Contract against his Club 47 

Appeal of Manager or Player 48 

When Director is Ineligible to Try a Case 49 

Expenses of Trials and Arbitrations 50 

Decision of Joint Arbitration Committee Final. 51 

PLAYING RULES. 

When Enacted and Amended 49 

CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Championship to be Contended for yearly 53 

Season 54 

Games, What are 55 

* ' Number of, in Series 56 

Tie, or Drawn Games, how Played off 56 

Home Club Entitled to Half of Series on its Grounds 57 




OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



Section, 

I Iome Club to Control Exhibition of Game 57 

" to be Furnished Batting Order of Visiting Club. 57 

Championship Schedule ^8 

Schedule Date not to be Changed Except . 53 

Admission to Championship Game, Price of... 59 

Correspondence Concerning Championship Games, by whom 

Conducted ^ 

Receipts of Championship Games, Statement and Pay- 
ment of . .... 6! 

Admission to Championship Games, how Regulated 61 

League Games Forbidden Prior to Championship Season. . . 62 
Games between League and Non-League Clubs, Regula- 
tions Governing 63 

Games between League and Non-League Clubs, Division of 

Receipts (i, 3) 63 

Games between League and Non- League Clubs, Penalty for 

Non-Payment (3, 4) 63 

Count of Forfeit Games 64 

Drawn, Tie or Postponed Games not to Count but be 

Played off 65 

The Champion Club 66 

Emblem of Championship 67 

Mode of Deciding Championship 67 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Time and Place 68 

Delegates and Visitors 6c> 

Special Meetings, how Called 70 

Quorum .. 7! 

Order of Business 70 

AMENDMENTS. 

Amendments to Constitution or Playing Rules (1) 73 

Suspension of Constitution (2) 73 



CONSTITUTION 

— OF THE — 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL GLUBS, 
1888. 



Section i. This Association shall be called "The National 
League of Professional Base Ball Clubs." 

OBJECTS. 
SEC. 2. The objects of this League are ; 

1. To encourage, foster, and elevate the game of base ball; to 
enact and enforce proper rules for the exhibition and conduct of 

ime, and to make base ball playing respectable and honor- 
able. 

2. To protect and promote the mutual interests of professional 
base ball clubs and professional base ball players, and, 

3. To establish and regulate the base ball championship of the 
United States. 

MEMBERSHIP, 

Sec. 3. This League shall consist of such professional base 
ball clubs as may from time to time be elected to membership, but 
in no event shall there be more than one club from any city. 

SEC. 4. No club shall be admitted from any city whose popula- 
tion is less than seventy-five thousand (75, 000) , except by unani- 
mous vote of the League. 

S» . 5. Mo dub shall be admitted unless it shall first have de- 
livered to the Secretary of the League, at least live days before the 
annual meeting, a written application for membership, signed by 
its President and Secretary, accompanied by documents showing 
that such club bears the name of the city in which it is located, 

(6) 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



and that it is regularly organized and officered, and where the 
State law permits it, chartered. Such application shall at once be 
transmitted by the Secretary to the President of the League, who 
shall forthwith refer it to a committee of three members of the 
Board of Directors, appointed by him, who shall immediately in- 
vestigate and report upon said application; said report to be com- 
municated to the League through the Secretary. 

SEC. 6. The voting upon an application for membership shall 
be by white and black balls. Two black balls shall be sufficient 
to exclude the applicant, and no club shall be required under any 
circumstances to state how it voted upon such application. Such 
election shall take place at the annual meeting of the League. 
Provided y That should any eligible club desire to join the League 
after the adjournment of the annual meeting, it may make appli- 
cation in writing to the Secretary of the League, who shall at once 
communicate such application, together with any facts in his pos- 
session concerning such applicant, to the President of the League, 
who shall refer it to a special committee of the Hoard, as provided 
in Section 6; and upon receipt by the Secretary of the report of 
said committee, he shall transmit such application and report to 
all League clubs, each of whom shall, within ten days, transmit 
one written ballot for or against the admission of such applicant, 
to the Secretary, and if two adverse ballots be not cast, then the 
Secretary shall, upon receipt of the annual dues, notify such club 
of its election. 

SEC, 7. In case any League club shall forfeit its membership 
during the championship season, the Board of Directors may elect 
a non-League club to temporary membership in the League, which 
election shall entitle such temporary club member, without the 
payment of League club dues, to play all the championship sched- 
ule games remaining unplayed by the retired League club, upon 
the same terms and conditions as League clubs, except that such 
games shall not count in the championship series, and such tem- 
porary membership shall terminate at the next annual meeting of 
the League. 

DUES, ASSESSMENTS, FINES, ETC. 

Sec. 8. Every League club shall pay to the Secretary of the 
League on or before the lirst day of May of each year, the sum of 
one hundred dollars as annual dues; and on or before the twenty- 
fifth day of each month of the championship season, such other 
sum as 'may be lawfully assessed for the payment of salaries of of- 
ficers and umpires, and for such other expenses as may be in- 
curred by order of the League, or of the Board of IHrectors. 

(2.) Upon conviction of any of the offences prescribed in Sec- 
tion m, as causes for expulsion — the Board of Directors may, in 
the first instance, as a preliminary to, or in lieu of expulsion, im- 



8 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



pose such a tine as is in their judgment, commensurate with the 
injury; which fine may include a penalty payable to any other 
League club or clubs, as an equivalent for damages, sustained for 
such violation of this Constitution, or the legislation or contracts 
made in pursuance thereof. 

GUARANTEE FUND. 

Si .• 'Mi). Each club elected to membership shall within thirty 
iter official notice of such election — by its President or other 
chief executive officer— sign and affix its common seal to this con- 
stitute enant to fulfil all the obligations and requirements 
thereof, and of all legislation and contracts made in pursuance 
then 

It shall at the same time execute and deliver unto the President 
of the League, as Trustee for the other League Clubs, a bond 
with Approved sureties in the penal sum of five thousand dollars 
(|5, (xx)), conditioned for the faithful performance of said Consti- 
tutional Covenants, and for the payment into the Guarantee 
FUND of the sum of five thousand dollars ($5,000), in annual in- 
stallments of not less than one thousand dollars ($1,000), payable 
during the month of May; any default to cause the forfeiture of 
said penal Bum, and of all installments previously paid into said 
fund. 

(2.) The GUARANTEE FUND shall be invested by the Board of 
Directors in United States Government Honds, or'in such other 
interest bearing-securities as the League in meeting shall direct. 
Said securities shall always be subject to the inspection of the 
League, or of its Auditing (.'ommiitcc appointed for the purpose. 

(3-) The interest and income accruing from such securities 
shall, as soon as collected, be transferred into the treasury m aid 
of the current and contingent expenses of the League. 

(4-) The principal of said fund shall, except as hereinafter 
stated, be kept intact as a guarantee against any violation of the 
provisions of this Constitution, or of the legislation and contracts 
made in pursuance thereof. 

o ) The failure of a club to pay into said fund, when due, any 
annual installment of its contribution thereto, shall forfeit the full 
penal sum of its bond, and suit may at once be entered for the 
rv of the same, or In lieu thereof, and in default of a collec- 
tion of the same, the Hoard of Directors, unless otherwise in- 
structed by the League, may expel said club from membership in 
the manner prescribed in Section II, when the installment or in- 
stallments already paid shall be forfeited, converted into cash and 
transferred into the treasury in aid of the current and contingent 
expenses of the League. 

(6.) Upon the acceptance of the resignation of a club from 



LEAOIE U»N>TlTt*TION. 







membership or upon the involuntary termination of such member- 
ship for "business rea s provided for in Section 10, said 
club shall be entitled to a return of its bond and of its entire con- 
tribution to the Guarantee Fund (less all dues, assessments, and 
either in cash or, at the option of the 
Board of Directors, in the securities in which the said cash may 
then be invested. 

{7.) Upon thirty days 1 default by a club — after due notice by 
the Secretary— in its payment of dues; assessments, or fines im- 
posed in pursuance of this Constitution, the Board of Directors 
shall declare forfeited an equivalent amount of said club's con- 
tribution to the GUAR ANTE! FUND, whkh equivalent amount, 
together with such additional line for said default— as may be im- 
by said Hoard— shall be repaid within three months there- 
after, under penalty of forfeiture of the bond of said club and of its 
entire contribution to said fund, and of its expulsion from mem- 
bership. Provided, That nothing herein contained shall be con- 
strued to prohibit a collection by suit on said bond, either before 
or after expulsion, of any unpaid installments of said club's con- 
tribution to said fund requisite to satisfy and liquidate all arrears 
of said dues, assessments and fines. 

(8.) Upon a club's expulsion from membership for persistence 
in an unaccepted resignation, its entire contribution to the Cuar- 
antee Fund Shall be forfeited, and suit may be instituted on its 
bond for all unpaid instalments thereof. 

Sec 10. The membership of any League Club may be ter- 
minated, 

(r.) By resignation dvAy aettpttd by a majority vote of all the 
ie Clubs in meeting duly convened. 

(2.) By an adverse vote of two-thirds of the remaining League 
Clubs in meeting duly Convened, when, for business reasons, such 

membership shall no longer be desirable. 

(3.) By expulsion in the manner prescribed in Section 1 1, for 
failure to sign the Constitution, and deliver the bond and pay its 

contributions to the Guarantee Fund as prescribed in Section 

9; or 

Failure to pay the visiting club the amount due under the pro- 
visions of .Section 6l ol this Constitution. 

Failure to present its nine at the time and place agreed upon to 
play any championship game unless caused by unavoidable acci- 
dent in traveling; or 

Selling or allowing to be sold upon its grounds, or in any build- 
ing owned or occupied by it during the championship season, any 
spirituous, vinous or malt liquors; or 

Allowing open betting or pool selling upon its grounds, or in 
any building owned or occupied by it; or 



10 



league Constitution. 



Playing any game of ball with a club that is disqualified or in- 
eligible under this Constitution or the National Agreement of 
Professional Base ball Clubs; or 

Offering, agreeing, conspiring, or attempting to lose any game 
of ball, or failing to immediately expel any player who shall be 
proven guilty of offering, agreeing, conspiring or attempting to 
lose any game of ball, or of being interested in any pool or wager 
thereon; or 

Taking part in any game of ball on Sunday. 

Disband ment of its organization or nine; or 

Failing or refusing to fulfill its contractual obligations with the 
other League Clubs; or 

Failing or refusing to comply with any lawful requirement of 
the Board of Directors; or 

Wilfully violating auy provision of this Constitution, or the 
Legislation or Playing Rules made in pursuance thereof. 

Sec. ii. To carry into effect the provisions of Sections 9 and 
10 of this Constitution, the facts in any case covered by such sec- 
tions must be reported to the Secretary of the League, who shall 
at once telegraph the party charged with the specified default or 
offence, inquiring whether any dispute exists as to the facts 
alleged. In case the facts are disputed, the Board shall, after due 
notice, try the rase under such regulations as they may prescribe, 
and their findings shall be final and conclusive on all parties ex- 
cept in case of expulsion, when such finding shall be forwarded 
to each League Club, which shall transmit to the Secretary writ- 
ten ballots "For Expulsion," or "Against Expulsion;" anil if all 
League clubs vote "For Expulsion," the Secretary shall notify 
all League clubs of the forfeiture of membership of the party 
charged; and every club shall, on or after the receipt of such 
notice, govern its intercourse with such expelled member by the 
prohibitions and penalties prescribed by this Constitution. 

SEC. 12. (Par. 1.) The umpires, managers and players employed 
by the clubs belonging to this League shall be considered and 
treated as members hereof to the extent of being always amena- 
ble to the provisions of this Constitution, and entitled to all its 
privileges in matters of dispute, grievance or discipline, as pro- 
vided in this Constitution. 

(2.) Any umpire, manager or player, having forfeited member- 
ship, shall* not be readmitted, except by unanimous vote of the 
League. 

Sec. 13. A list to be designated "the black list," shall be kept 
by the Secretary of the names of any persons who may be declared, 
by an affirmative vote of five League clubs, at any regular or 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



11 



special meeting, to be unworthy of service in the League, as um- 
pire, manager or player, and any person so named shall be disqual- 
ified for employment by, or service in any League club, until his 
name be removed from such list by unanimous vote of all League 
clubs at a regular or special meeting. {See paragraphs 4, 7 and 12 
of League contract). The Secretary shall immediately notify all 
League clubs of any name placed upon or removed from such 
list of disqualified persons. 



Sec. 14. At its annual meeting the League shall elect a Presi* 
dent by ballot. The President shall be ex officio chairman of the 
Board of Directors. He shall preside at all the meetings of the 
League, and shall call special meetings of the League when he 
may deem it necessary, or when thereto requested by half of the 
clubs of the League. 

Should the office of President become vacant by death, resig- 
nation, or removal, the Board of Directors shall within thirty 
days elect a President. 

Sec. 15. The affairs of this League shall be conducted and con- 
trolled by inc Directors, who shall constitute "The Hoard," and 
who shall consist of the President and four members, to be chosen 
at the annual meeting, in the following manner: The name of 
each club, except that of which the President is a member, shall 
be plainly written upon a card, in full view of the delegates pres- 
ent, by the Secretary; the cards to be of the same size, shape, 
color and material. The cards shall then be placed in some suit- 
able receptacle, and well shaken together; thereupon four of these 
cards shall be drawn successively, and at random, and one 
delegate from each of the four clubs whose names are so 
drawn, shall, with the President, compose the Board, and if 
any club whose name is thus drawn be represented by two dele- 
gates, such delegate shall name one of their number to be a 
member of the Board: Pryvided t That at any time after the ad- 
journment of the annual League meeting, any League club repre- 
sented on the Board may substitute another representative; such 
substitution to be attested by written notice to the Secretary, 
signed by the President of the* League club, and upon receipt of 
such notice by the Secretary, such substitution shall take effect, 
and the Secretary shall thereupon notify all League clubs. 

Sec. 16. No person shall be qualified to act as Director who is 
not an actual member of the club he represents; nor shall any 
club, under any circumstances, be represented by more than one 
person on the Board. 

Sec. 17. The Board shall have the general supervision and 
management of all affairs and business of the League and 



12 LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 

shall be individually answerable to the League for the faithfu] 
discharge of their trust. 

Sec, iS. The Board shall meet anuually on the morning of the 
third Wednesday in November at nine o'clock at the place where 
the annual meeting of the League is to be held, but may hold 
special meetings whenever urgent necessity may require. 

Sec. 19. The Board shall prepare a detailed report of all their 
doings, and present the same, in writing, to the League, at its 
annual meeting, which report shall, if accepted, be filed with the 
Secretary, together with all official papers, documents and prop- 
erty which may have come into their possession by virtue of their 
office. 

Sit. 20. Any Director who shall disclose or publish any of the 
proceedings of the Board, except officially through the report of 
the Board, or when called upon by vote of the League, shall for- 
feit his office. 

Sec. 21. In case of a vacancy in the Board by reason of the 
death, resignation, absence, or disqualification of any Director, 
the club of which he was a member at the time he was chosen 
shall designate his successor, and at once notify the Secretary. 
But if such vacancy is caused by the withdrawal, disbanding or 
disqualification of a club represented on the Board, the Board 
may fill the vacancy by election in the same manner as provided 
for the election of Directors in Section 15. 

SEC. 22. The Board shall elect a gentleman of intelligence, 
honesty and good repute, who is versed in base ball matters, but 
who is not in any manner connected with the press, and who is 
not a member of any professional base ball club, either in or 
out of the League, to be the Secretary of the Board and of the 
League. 

Sec. 23. The Secretary shall be the Treasurer of the League, 
and as such shall be the custodian of all funds of the League, 
receive all dues, fees and assessments, make such payments as 
shall be ordered by the Board, or by the vote of the League, and 
render annually a report of his accounts, and shall give such bond 
with approved sureties as the Board may require. 

Sec. 24. The Secretary shall have the custody and care of the 
official records and papers of the League; shall keep a true record 
of all meetings of the League and the Board shall issue all official 
notices and attend to the necessary correspondence; he shall pre- 
pare and furnish such reports as may be called for by the Board, 
and shall be entitled to such books, stationery, blanks and mater- 
ials as the actual duties of his office may require. 

Sec. 25. The Secretary shall keep a record of all infractions of 
the rules and regulations of the League that may come to his 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



13 



notice, and shall (except in cases covered by Sections n and 13) 
make a report on the same tothe President, who shall present it to 
the Board at its next meeting. 

Sec. 26. The Secretary shall receive such salary as the Board, 
by vote, shall determine, and shall be reimbursed for all traveling 
expenses actually incurred by him in the service of the League; 
and the Board may exact from him such guarantees for the faith- 
ful performance of his duties as they may deem for the interest 
and safety of the League. At the expiration of his term of 
office, he shall account for and deliver up to the Board all the 
property and papers which may have come into his hands by vir- 
tue of his office. 



LEAGUE CLUBS, UMPIRES, MANAGERS AND PLAYERS. 

Sec. 27. Each club belonging to this League shall have the 
right to regulate its own affairs, to make its own contracts, to 
establish its own rules, and to discipline, punish, suspend, or 
expel its own manager, players or other employes, and these pow- 
ers shall not be limited to cases of dishonest play or open insubor- 
dination, but shall include all questions of carelessness, indiffer- 
ence, or other conduct of the player that may be regarded by the 
club as prejudicial to its interests: Provided, That all club regu- 
lations must be made subordinate to and in conformity with the 
general regulations established by this League, and no club shall 
prescribe any rule or regulation in conflict with any provision 
of this Constitution, or the Playing Rules. (See also League 
contract). 

Sec. 28. Ever)' club member of this League shaH have exclus- 
ive control of the city in which it is located, and of the territory 
surrounding such city, to the extent of four miles in every 
direction from its corporate limits, and no visiting League club 
shall, under any circumstances — except with the consent of the 
local League club, until all League championship games on that 
ground shall have been finished, be allowed to play any club in 
such territory other than the League club therein located, nor 
shall a visiting League club play any game in April with any non- 
League club within the corporate limits of the city in which the 
League club is located, without the consent of the local League 
club. 

Sec. 29. An agreement may be made between a club and a 
manager or player for services by the manager or player, and 
compensation therefor by the club, by telegram or other writing, 
and notice of such agreement may be sent by telegraph to the Sec- 
retary of the League, specifying the term of service agreed upon, 
and the Secretary shall, immediately upon the receipt of such 
notice notify all League clubs and all Associations, parties to the 



J4 LEAGUE CONSTITUTION*. 

•'National Agreement of Professional Base Ball Associations,'* 
that the said club has contracted with the said player for the period 
specified, and the contract thus made and promulgated shall be 
valid and binding upon all Provided, That within thirty days 
from the date of making such agreement, the club and the player 
shall further evidence such agreement by the execution of a con- 
tract in the form prescribed by the League (see League con:: 
and the Secretary of the League shall, upon application, furnish 
each League club a suitable supply of the printed forms of 
contract adopted by the League, and in the event that the said 
player shall refuse within the said thirty days, to sign the said 
formal League contract, the said club shall notify the Secretary, 
who shall at once place the name of said player on the ''Black 
List," and the player shall thereupon become disqualified, and 
the Secretary shall issue notice of such disqualification as provided 
in Section 13 of this Constitution. 

No player, not under one of the two forms of contract specified 
in this Section, shall be eligible to play in a League game, except 
that in case a player shall nieet with an accident, or be expelled 
by his club, any player who is not otherwise disqualified, under 
the provisions of this Constitution, may take the place of such 
expelled or injured player; but such player shall not be eligible to 
play for more than live championship games in the nine of such 
club, without the contract and notice thereof required by this 
Section, or Section 30. 

Sec. 30. It shall be the further duty of a club within ten days 
after it shall have entered into a formal League contract with a 
manager or player, to transmit said contract to the Secretary of 
the League. If the Secretary shall find the contract to be in the 
form adopted by the League, lie shall indorse upon it his certifi- 
cate to that effect, together with the date of its receipt by him, 
and at once return it to the contracting club. The Secretary 
shall also enter upon his records the names of the contracting 
club, and manager or player, and immediately notify all other 
League clubs of such contract, unless the notice specified in Sec- 
tion 29 has already been issued. In no case shall the Secretary 
give such certificate, or give notice of such contract, unless it 
comply, in all respects, with the form of contract adopted by the 
League, and no such contract shall be regarded as valid or bind- 
ing until it bears the Secretary's certificate as herein provided. 

Sec. 31. Any player while under contract with a League club, 
who shall, without the consent of such club, agree to enter the 
service of any other club after the expiration of such contract, shall 
be liable to expulsion by said League club. Whenever a club re- 
leases a manager or player without notice, or gives him ten days' 
notice of release, in accordance with paragraphs 15 or 20 of the 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



15 



League contract, and whenever it suspends or expels a manager or 
player, that club shall at once notify the Secretary, stating in case 
of release, the date when the same takes effect, and in case of sus- 
pension or expulsion, the cause thereof, and the Secretary shall at 
once notify all other clubs of the League. 

Si • . 32. Releases of players from contract or reservation, and 
future contracts with such players, shall he regulated and governed 
by the National Agreement Of professional base ball clubs and the 
League legislation made in pursuance thereof. 

Sec. 33. A manager or player, whose contract has become void 
by reason of his club's disbanding, withdrawing from or losing its 
membership in the League, may engage for the remainder of the 
season with any other club immediately after the 1 .eague Secretary's 
notice of such disband ment, withdrawal, or loss of membership. 

Sec. 34. No manager or player who has been suspended or ex- 
pelled from a League club, or suspended by the League under the 
provisions of Section 13 of this Constitution, shall at any time 
thereafter be allowed to play with or serve any League club (either 
the one expelling him or any other) unless the term of suspension 
by the club has expired, or upon his appeal to the Board, such 
suspension or expulsion shall have been set aside, or in any case 
under Section 13 his name shall have been removed from the* black 
list by unanimous vote of the League, as provided in said section. 

Sec. 35. No club shall employ as umpire, manager, scorer, or 
player, any person who has willfully violated any provision of this 
Constitution, or of the Playing Rules, or who has been expelled 
from any club belonging to this League, or who shall be disquali- 
fied from playing with a club under any provision of this Con- 
stitution. 

SKC, 36. No game of ball shall be played between a League 
club and any other club that has been expelled from membership 
in this League. No game of ball shall be played between a 
League club and any other club employing or presenting in its 
nine a player expelled or under suspension from the League, or 
otherwise rendered Ineligible by the National Agreement, or the 
legislation made in pursuance thereof. 

SKC, 37. Any manager or player who may consider himself ag- 
grieved or injured by any act of his club, or of any officer, agent 
or employe thereof, shall make his complaint thereof to the Presi- 
dent of the club when the club "nine" is at home. Any manager 
or player, under contract with a League club, who shall, without 
the written consent of such club, leave its service, or who shall be 
proven guilty cf offering, agreeing, conspiring, or attempting to 
lose any game of ball, or of being interested in any pool or wager 
thereon, shall be at once expelled by such club. 

SEC. 38. Any manager or player under contract with a League 



16 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



club, whose name shall be placed upon the black list provided for 
in Section 13 of this Constitution, in the manner therein provided, 
shall immediately upon receipt by such club of the Secretary's no- 
tice of such action, be discharged by such club from its service. 
(See paragraphs 4, 7 and 12 of the League contract.) 

Sec. 39. Any person under contract with a League club, who 
shall be guilty of drunkenness, gambling in any form, insubordi- 
nation, or of any dishonorable or disreputable conduct (except the 
offenses requiring expulsion, specified in Sec. 37), may be fined or 
suspended by such club for the remainder of the playing season, 
or for the remainder of that and all of the ensuing playing season, 
at the option of such club. And during the period of such sus- 
pension, such person shall be disqualified from playing in or 
against, or serving any League club: Provided, That the club 
having made the suspension shall net have power to rescind it or 
to curtail its duration. 

The President of the League shall have power, upon proper 
proof, to inflict a fine for any of such offences, not exceeding two 
hundred dollars ($200), which fine can only be remitted by the 
Board of Directors. (Sec. 6 League Contract.) 

Sec. 40. Any person who shall be proven guilty of offering, 
agreeing, conspiring, or attempting to cause any game of ball to 
result otherwise than on its merits under the Playing Rules, or 
who, while acting as Umpire, shall violate any provision of the 
Constitution, or of the Playing Rules adopted hereunder, may be 
forever disqualified by the President of the League from acting as 
Umpire of any game of ball participated in by a League club. 



THE UMPIRE. 

Sec. 41. A staff of four League Umpires shall be selected by 
the Secretary before the 1st day of May. 

(1.) Applications for such positions will be received by the Sec- 
retary until the 1st day of March. 

(2.) They shall be paid such salaries and allowed such ex- 
penses as may be mutually agreed upon by contract between 
them and the Secretary of the League, subject to the approval of 
the Board of Directors of the League. 

(3.) He shall be under the sole control and direction of the 
Secretary, from whom he will receive all assignments to duty, and 
all instructions regarding the interpretation of the Playing Rules, 
aud the Secretary shall prescribe a proper uniform for him, all 
parts of which shall be worn when officiating as Umpire. 

(4.) In the event of the failure of such Umpire to umpire a 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION'. 



17 



game assigned to him, it shall be the duty of the Secretary to pro- 
vide a substitute to umpire such game, and in such case there 
shall be deducted from the next monthly payment to the League 
Umpire the sum of twelve dollars for each game assigned to him, 
which for any reason he shall have failed to umpire. 

(5.) It shall be the duty of each League club to accept as Um- 
pire for any championship game such League Umpire or substi- 
tute as the Secretary shall assign to such game, and only in the 
event of the failure of the League Umpire or substitute so as- 
signed to appear at the hour appointed for the beginning of such 
game, shall the duty devolve upon the visiting club to designate 
an Umpire for such game. 

(6.) Any League Umpire shall be subject to removal by the 
Secretary at any time, and in the event of the resignation, removal 
or expulsion of any League Umpire the Secretary shall have power 
to appoint a suitable person to till the vacancy thus created. 

Sec. 42. Any League Umpire who shall in the judgment of the 
President of the League be guilty of ungentlemanly conduct, or of 
selling, or offering to sell, a game of which he is Umpire, shall 
thereupon be removed from his official capacity, and placed under 
the same disabilities inflicted upon expelled players by the Consti- 
tution of the League. 

Sec. 43. The Umpire's furls dictions and Pozuers, in addition 
to those specified in the preceding Rules, are: 

(1.) The gentleman selected to fill the position of Umpire must 
keep constantly in mind the fact that upon his sound discretion 
and promptness in conducting the game, compelling players to ob- 
serve the spirit as well as the letter of the Rules, and enforcing 
each and every one of the Rules, largely depends the merit of the 
game as an exhibition, and the satisfaction of spectators therewith. 
He must make his decisions distinct and clear, remembering that 
every spectator is anxious to hear such decision. lie must keep 
the contesting nines playing constantly from the commencement 
of the game to its termination, allowing such delays only as are 
rendered unavoidable by accident, injury or rain. lie must, until 
the completion of the game, require the players of each side to 
promptly take their positions in the field as soon as the third hand 
is put out, and must require the first striker of the opposite side 
to be in his position at the bat as soon as the fielders are in their 
places. 

(2.) The players of the side "at bat" must occupy the portion 
of the field allotted them, subject to the condition that they must 
speedily vacate any portion thereof that may be in the way of the 
ball, or any fielder attempting to catch or field it. The triangular 
space behind the Home Base is reserved for the exclusive use of 
the Umpire, Catcher and Batsman, and the Umpire must prohibit 



18 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



any player of the side "at bat" from crossing the same at any 
time while the ball is in the hands of the Pitcher or Catcher, or is 
passing between them, while standing in their positions. 

(3.) Section 9 of the League Constitution makes the League 
Umpire a member of the League. During the progress of a 
game he is the sole representative of the League, to see that the 
game is played and determined solely on its merits, and these 
Rules invest him with ample powers to accomplish this purpose. 
In the performance of his duties he must remember that his sole 
allegiance is due to the League. 

(4.) The Umpire is master of the field from the commencement 
to the termination of the game, and must compel the players to 
observe the provisions of all the Playing Rules, and he is hereby 
invested with authority to order any player to do or omit to do 
any act, as he may deem it necessary to give force and effect to 
any and all of such provisions, and power to inflict upon any 
player disobeying any such order a fine of not less than five nor 
more than fifty dollars for each offense, and to impose a similar 
fine upon any player who shall use abusive, threatening or im- 
proper language to the Umpire, audience, or other player, and 
when the Umpire shall have so punished the player, he shall not 
have the power to revoke or remit the penalty so inflicted. (See 
League Contract, paragraph II.) 

(5.) The Umpire shall at once notify the Captain of the offend- 
ing player's side of the infliction of any fine herein provided for, 
and the club to which such player belongs shall, upon receipt of a 
notice of said fine from the Secretary of the League, within ten 
days transmit the amount of such fine to the Secretary of the 
League. 

(6.) In case the Umpire imposes a fine on a player, or declares 
a game forfeited, he shall transmit a written notice thereof to the 
Secretary of the League within twenty-four hours thereafter ; and 
if he shall fail to do so, he shall forfeit his position as League 
Umpire, and shall forever thereafter be ineligible to umpire any 
League game. 

DISPUTES AND COMPLAINTS. 

Sec. 44. The Board of Directors shall be the sole tribunal to 
determine disputes between clubs ; the facts to be submitted, and 
the dispute adjudicated under such regulations as the Board shall 
prescribe in each case. The finding of the Board shall be final, 
and under no circumstances shall be reconsidered, re-opened, or 
inquired into, either by the League or any subsequent Board. 

Sec. 45. The Board shall at once consider any complaint pre- 
ferred by a club against a manager or player of another club (prior 
to the expiration of the championship season) for conduct in vio- 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



19 



lation of any provision of this Constitution, or prejudicial to the 
good repute of the game of base ball, and shall have power to 
require the club to which such manager or player may belong, to 
discipline him, and upon repetition of such offence, to expel him : 
Provided, That such complaint be preferred in writing, giving 
such particulars as may enable the Board to ascertain all the facts, 
and be transmitted to the Secretary, by whom it shall at once be 
referred to the Board. 

Sec, 46. In case a player under reserve for the ensuing season 
by any League club, shall prefer a complaint in writing to the 
Secretary of the League, against said club, alleging : 

1. That such club is in arrears to him on account of his con- 
tract for the current season, or 

2. That he has offered to enter into contract with such club lot 
the ensuing season at a compensation of one thousand dollars fo' 
seven months' service, but that the said club has declined either U- 
enter into such contract, or to release him from reservation, the 
Secretary shall at once transmit to the said club a copy of such 
complaint, and require an answer thereto. On receipt of such an- 
swer, or if one week shall have elapsed without the receipt of an 
answer, the Secretary shall refer the papers in the case to the 
Chairman of the Board. The Board shall thereupon try the case 
under such regulations as they may prescribe, and should they find 
the player's complaints sustained by the facts, they shall release 
the player from reservation, and instruct the Secretary of th< 
League to issue notice of such release, in like manner as if th< 
player had been voluntarily released by the club. The BoarG 
shall also, should they find the club in arrears to the player, re- 
quire the club, under penalty of forfeiture of its membership, to 
pay to the player, within ten days, the full amount ascertained to 
be due him. 

Sec. 47. In case a player under contract with a League club 
shall prefer a complaint in writing to the Secretary of the League, 
against such club, alleging that such club is in arrears to him on 
account of such contract, the Secretary shall act in the matter as 
provided in the preceding Section, and should the Board find the 
player's complaint sustained, they shall require the club, under 
penalty of forfeiture of its membership, to pay to the player with- 
in ten days, the full amount ascertained to be due him : Provided, 
That should the player refuse to serve the club, pending action by 
the Board on his complaint, he will thereby forfeit the benefits of 
the award, and in such case the Board shall revoke his award. 

Sec. 48. The Board shall also be the sole tribunal for the hear- 
ing of an appeal made by any person who shall have been expelled 
or suspended by his club. The matter shall be proceeded with in 
the following manner : Such person shall, within thirty days after 



20 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



the date of the expulsion or suspension, file with the Secretary a 
written statement of his defence, accompanied by a request that 
an appeal be allowed him. The Secretary shall notify the club of 
the request for an appeal, accompanying such notice with a copy 
of the appeal, and at the next annual meeting, the club, by its 
duly authorized representative, and the appellant in person, by 
attorney, or by written statement, shall appear before the Board 
with their testimony. The Board shall impartially hear the mat- 
ter and render their decision, which shall be final, and forever 
binding on both club and player. 

Sec. 49. No Director shall sit in the trial of a cause in which 
his club is interested. 

Sec. 50. Any expenses of trials o r arbitrations shall be borne 
equally by the parties to the controversy. 

Sec. 51. In all disputes, complaints or questions arising under 
"The National Agreement of Professional B. B. Associations," 
between this League and any other association of clubs, party to 
such agreement, or between any club of this League and any club 
of any other association, party to such agreement, the adjudica- 
tion thereof shall be left entirely to the joint Board of Arbitration 
provided for by such agreement, and this League will comply 
with and be bound by the award, findings or verdict of such 
Board in any such case, so long as this League continues a party to 
such " National Agreement." 

Sec. 52. The League, at its annual meeting, shall adopt a 
code of Playing Rules, which shall continue in force subject only 
to such alterations or amendments as may be made by the joint 
committee on National Playing Rules. 

CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Sec. 53. The Championship of the United States, established 
by this League, shall be contended for yearly by the clubs compos- 
ing this League. 

Sir. 54. The championship season shall extend from such date 
in April or May to such date in September or October as the 
League may determine at its stated or special meeting. 

Sec. 55. Every game played between two clubs from the com- 
mencement of the championship season to the completion of the 
championship series between such clubs, shall be a game for the 
championship, and no League club shall lend or exchange players, 
to or with each other, for any game played during the champion- 
ship season. 

Sec. 56. Each club shall play eighteen championship games 
(and no. more) with every other club. Provided \ however, That if 
any game be prevented by rain, or if a tie or drawn game be 



V 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



21 



played, the visiting club shall play off such tie or drawn game or 
games prevented by rain, on the tirst succeeding day (not count- 
ing Sundays, days previously agreed upon for championship 
games between said clubs, or days when rain renders playing im- 
possible) within the dates of the same schedule series between 
such clubs, if any remain open; and if not, such game may be 
played off on any open date on either grounds. 

Sec. 57. Each club shall have half of the championship series 
of games with every other club played on its own grounds; and in 
all the details of such games that do not involve the rights of the 
visiting club under the Playing Rules, but relate solely to such 
games as attractive exhibitions to the patrons of the home club, 
and the visiting club shall furnish to a person designated by the 
home club the batting order of its nine by 10 o'clock on the morn- 
ing of the day of each game. In case of the failure of any visit- 
ing club to furnish the batting order of its nine as herein 
stipulated, it shall forfeit the sum of $10, which amount shall be 
immediately transmitted to the Secretary of the League upon the 
receipt of notice from him of the infliction of such fine, which 
notice shall be given by the Secretary upon receipt of complaint 
from the hom<* club. 

It shall be the duty of the home club to furnish the manager 
and captain of the visiting club with a list of the batting order 
before the commencement of the game. The visiting club shall 
have the right to practice its nine on the grounds of the home 
club between 11 and 12 o'clock A. M. on each day of its visit 
during the championship season. 

Sec. 58. All championship games shall be arranged for in writ- 
ing, and so as to complete the championship series by the expira- 
tion of the championship season. Such written arrangement 
shall be made by such method as the League shall direct, before 
the beginning of the championship season, and shall consist of a 
schedule and agreement relating thereto, which agreement shall 
be signed by every League club, and the schedule and agreement 
filed with the Secretary of the League, and a copy thereof, bearing 
his certificate as to its correctness, furnished by the Secretary to 
every League club. The schedule shall provide for an equal 
number of return games, and specify the date of each game, and 
the dates of each series of games. No date in said schedule shall 
subsequently be changed, except (1) by written agreement of two 
clubs, from a date fixed by the schedule for a game between such 
clubs to another day between the first and last date of the same 
schedule series between such clubs; or (2) as provided in Section 
55; or (3) by the written consent of all the League clubs. 

Sec. 59. The price of admission to championship games shall 
be fifty cents for each adult person. 

Sec. 60. In correspondence between clubs, all letters and tele- 
grams concerning umpires, dates, and other matters pertaining to 



1^— 



22 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



championship games, to a club at home, must be addressed to 
and answered by its President, or by an officer of such club desig- 
nated by its President to act for him in such matters, the Secretary 
of the League to be notified of such designation. If such com- 
munication be made by another club when at home, they must be 
addressed by, and answered to its President or his representative, 
as above provided; and if the corresponding club be absent from 
home, they must be addressed by and answered to its manager. 

Sec, 6i. At the conclusion of each championship game, the 
home club shall deliver to the manager of the visiting club (and 
shall transmit by mail to the visiting club a duplicate of the 
same) a statement of the receipts of said game, and shall pay to 
the authorized agent of such visiting club the sum of twelve and 
one half cents (12 J4) for each and every person admitted to the 
grounds to witness such game or any part thereof, or admitted to 
the grounds for any other purpose during, or prior to such game, 
or the hour appointed therefor, excepting only players of contest- 
ing clubs, policemen in uniform, and necessary employes of the 
home club, provided, however, that whenever such twenty-five 
percentum shall be less than one hundred and fifty ($150) dollars 
the home club shall pay to the visiting club at least the sum of 
one hundred and fifty ($150) dollars. 

The number of persons admitted to the grounds shall be deter- 
mined by the use of the necessary number of self-registering turn- 
stiles, the keys of which shall be delivered to the agent of the 
visiting club before the opening of the grounds for each game ; 
and said agent of the visiting club shall have the right to affix 
a seal to the register, or box, of such turnstile, and the box of 
such turnstile shall not be removed untill after the close of the 
seventh inning, and in ease a carriage gate is used, a ticket for 
each person admitted through such gate shall at once be delivered 
to the agent of the visiting club. 

Sec. 62. No game shall be played between League clubs before 
the commencement of the championship series. 

Sec. 63. No game shall be played between any League club 
and any non-League club, or picked nine, upon the grounds of 
any League club, from the commencement to the completion of 
the championship series upon such grounds, except that any extra 
players of the home club may so play while the home club is 
absent from the city. No game shall be arranged or played be- 
tween any League and non-League clubs, or picked nines* for or 
upon any "off days" of the championship series, except as above 
provided, and upon the following express conditions; 

1. If a League championship game be prevented by rain or un- 
avoidable accident on the day (not counting Sunday) preceding 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



23 



the day agreed upon for such non-League or picked-nine game, 
then the latter shall be declared off, so as to allow the League 
clubs to play the championship game on that day. 

2. All such games shall be played under such rules, with such 
ball and such umpire, as may be mutually agreed upon by the 
League club and the non-League club, 

3. In the event of game stopped by rain before completion of 
third innings, the home club may issue rain-checks good for ad- 
mission to the next succeeding game. The uncompleted game 
shall be considered a postponed game, and no money paid to 
the visiting club. 

4. The non- League club shall, unless otherwise agreed by 
letter, telegram or other writing, pay the League club immediately 
upon the termination of play, without reference to the number of 
innings played, the sum of one hundred dollars or one-half the 
gross receipts of such game, in case the gross receipts shall exceed 
two hundred dollars; and it is to be distinctly understood that the 
" gross receipts " include all revenue derived from the exhibition, 
whether taken at regular or carriage gates, or for admission to 
grounds, grand stands, or to other special privileges of the 
grounds; also that the visiting club shall have sole control of all 
gates, and of all entrances to grand stands, or other special 
ground privileges for which extra fees are charged. And the 
non-League club shall pay the League club fifty dollars in every 
case where a League club shall present its nine in the city or 
town of such non- League club, prepared to play at the time ap- 
pointed for such game, and the game be prevented by rain, or by 
any cause other than the refusal by such League club to play such 
game. In the event of the refusal or failure of any non- League 
club to pay the sum or sums due, as stipulated, the League club shall 
at once telegraph such fact to the Secretary of the League, who 
shall forthwith notify all other League clubs by telegraph; and no 
League club shall thereafter play such defaulting club until the 
full amount due be paid the League club, which League club 
shall, in case of such payment, notify the Secretary, and he the 
other League clubs, by telegraph. 

5. In any case not covered by the first condition specified in 
this section, a League club having agreed to play a non-League 
club upon the grounds of the latter, and failing to present its 
nine in the city or town of such non-League club, prepared to 
play at the time appointed for such game, the League club shall 
pay the non-League club the sum of fifty dollars, or such other 
sum as may have been mutually agreed upon, as the penalty of 
such default. 

Sec. 64. A club shall be entitled to forfeited games — to count 
in its series as games won by a score of nine runs to none — in 



24 



LEAGUE CON'STITUTtON'. 



cases where the umpire in any championship game shall award the 
game to such club on account of the violation by the contesting 
club of any playing rule of this League; and in the event of said 
forfeiture being caused by the withdrawal of the players during 
the progress of the game, then the club so withdrawing its players 
shall incur a penalty of three hundred dollars, which shall be 
payable to the Secretary of the League within ten days thereafter. 

Sec. 65. Drawn, tie, and postponed games shall not count in 
the series as games (but any games of not less than five innings 
shall be included in the averages), but must be played off, if 
possible, as provided in Section 56. If they cannot be played off 
as therein provided, they may subsequently be played off, if 
sufficient time exists before the close of the season. 

Sec. 66. The club which shall have won the greatest percentage 
of games in the championship series shall be declared the cham- 
pion club of the United States for the season in which such 
games were played. In the event that two or more clubs shall 
have won the same percentage of games, then the Board shall at 
once arrange a special series of three games between any two of 
such clubs, such games to be played in the month of October, 
and the games so played shall be included in the championship 
record, and counted in determining the award of the champion- 
ship. In such case only the provisions of this Constitution pro- 
hibiting the playing or recording as Championship games, games 
played after the expiration of the championship season, shall have 
no effect. 

The emblem of the championship shall be a pennant (of the 
national colors) to cost not less than one hundred dollars ($100), 
It shall be inscribed with the motto, " Champion Base Ball Club 
of the United States," with the name of the club and the year in 
which the title was won, and the champion club shall be entitled ' 
to fly the pennant until the close of the ensuing season. 

Sec. 67. The championship shall be decided in the following 
manner: 

Within twenty-four hours after every match game played for the 
championship, the home club shall prepare and forward to the 
Secretary of the League a statement containing the full score of 
the game, according to the system specified in the "Playing 
Rules," the date, place where played, and names of the clubs and 
umpire: Provided, that no tie or drawn game shall be considered 
"a game" for any purpose except the averages; and provided 
further that in any case where the Secretary shall not receive the 
score of a championship game within five days after the playing 
of such game, the club whose duty it is to forward such score 
shall pay to the League the sum of ten dollars as the penalty of 
such default. 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



25 



At the close of the season the Secretary shall prepare a tabular 
statement of the games won and lost by each club, according to 
the statements so sent him (which statements shall be the sole 
evidence in the matter), and submit the same, with the statements 
so sent him, to the Board, who shall make the award in writing, 
and report the same to the League at its annual meeting. In 
making the award the Board shall consider: 

1. The tabular statement of the Secretary. 

2. Forfeited games. 

3- Games participated in by clubs which have withdrawn, dis- 
banded, or forfeited their membership without completing their 
championship series with all other League clubs; such games 
shall be counted to the following extent: The Board shall ascer- 
tain the least number of championship games played by such club 
with any club remaining in the League, and shall, from the first 
game participated in during the championship season by such re- 
tired club, count in the series of each League club a similar num- 
ber of games, and all other games participated in by such retired 
club shall not be counted in the championship series. Provided, 
That if such retired club shall have failed to play at least one cham- 
pionship game with every League club, all games participated in 
by it shall be thrown out entirely. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Sec, 68. The annual meeting of the League shall be held on 
the third Wednesday in November of each year, at twelve o'clock 
noon, and at such places as shall have been determined by a vote 
at the previous annual meeting. 

Sec. 69. At such meeting each club shall be represented, and 
shall be entitled to two representatives, and to have, in addition 
thereto, any of its officers or ex-officers present at such meet- 
ing; but no club shall be permitted to send as a representa- 
tive any person under contract or engagement as a ball player or 
manager, and belonging to the nine of such club in said capacity; 
they shall present a certificate from the President or Secretary of 
their club, showing their authority to act; but no club shall have 
more than one vote. 

Sec. 70. Special meetings may be called by the President of 
the League on his own option, or on the written call of four 
clubs. 

Sec. 71. A representation of a majority of clubs shall constitute 
a quorum for the transaction of business, but a less number may 
adjourn from time to time until a quorum is obtained. 

Sec. 72. The following shall be the order of business: 



20 



LEAGUE CONSTITLTION. 



i. Reading minutes of last meeting, 

2. Report of Board of Directors. 

3. Reports of special committees. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Amendment of Constitution. 

6. Amendment of Playing Rules. 

7. Election of officers. 

8. Miscellaneous business. 

9. Adjournment. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Sec. 73. (1) The Constitution of this League may be altered 
or amended by a two-thirds vote of the League at any annual 
meeting, or by a unanimous vote at any other time. 

(2) Any Section of this Constitution may be suspended or its 
provisions made non-applicable by unanimous vote at a League 
meeting. 



THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL BASE 
BALL CLUBS. 



THIS AGREEMENT, made between the Association known 
and designated as the National League of Professional Base Bal 
Clubs of the one part, and the Association known and designated 
as the American Association of Base Ball Clubs, of the other 
part, witnesseth, that : 

I. This document shall be entitled The National Agreement, 
and shall supersede and be a substitute for all other Agreements, 
similarly or otherwise designated, heretofore existing between the 
parties hereto. 

II. a. No contract shall be made for the services of any player 
by any Club member of either party hereto for a longer period 
than seven months, beginning April ist, and terminating October 
31st, and no such contract for services to be rendered after the 
expiration of the current year shall be made prior to the 20th day 
of October of such year, nor shall any player enter into any ne* 
gotiation or contract with any Club, Club agent, or individual for 
services to be rendered in an ensuing year prior to the said 20th 
of October. Upon written proofs of a violation of this section 
the Board of Arbitration shall disqualify such player for and dur- 
ing said ensuing year, and shall inflict a fine of five hundred dol- 
lars, payable forthwith into the treasury of the Board, upon the 
Club in whose interest such negotiations or contract was entered 
into. 

b. Every regular contract shall be forwarded within ten days 
after its execution to the Secretary of the Association of which 
the contracting Club is a member, for registry and approval, 
who shall forthwith notify the Secretary of the other Association 
party hereto, and the other Club members of his Association. 

27 



28 THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 

III. When a player under contract with or reservation by, 
any Club member of either Association party hereto is expelled, 
blacklisted, suspended, or rendered ineligible in accordance with 
its rules, notice of such disqualification shall be served upon the 
Secretary of this Board by the Secretary of the Association from 
whose Club such player shall have been thus disqualified, and the 
Secretary of this Board shall forthwith serve notice of such dis- 
qualification upon the Secretary of the other Association party 
hereto. When a player becomes ineligible under the provisions 
of this Agreement, the Secretary of this Board shall notify the 
Secretaries of the Associations parties hereto of such disqualifi- 
cation, and from the receipt of such notice all Club members of 
the parties hereto shall be debarred from employing or playing 
with, or against, such disqualified player, until the period of dis- 
qualification shall have terminated, or the disqualification be 
revoked by the Association from which such player was disquali- 
fied, or by this Board, and due notice of such revocation served 
upon the Secretary of the other Association, and by him upon his 
respective Clubs. 

IV. On the tenth day of October in each year the Secretary of 
each Association shall transmit to the Secretary of the other As- 
sociation a reserve list of players, not exceeding fourteen in num- 
ber, then under contract with each of its several Club members. 
and of such players reserved in any prior annual reserve list, who 
have refused to contract with said Club members and of all other 
ineligible players, and such players, together with all others there- 
after to be regularly contracted with by such Club members, are 
and shall be ineligible to contract with any Club member of the 
other Association, except as hereinafter prescribed. 

V. Upon the release of a player from contract or reservation 
with any Club member of either Association party hereto, the ser- 
vices of such player shall at once be subject to the acceptance of 
the other Clubs of such Association, expressed in writing or by 
telegraph, to the Secretary thereof for a period of ten days after 
notice of said release, and thereafter if said services be not so ac- 
cepted, said player may negotiate and contract with any other Club. 
The Secretary of such Association shall send notice to the Secre- 



THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



211 



tary of the other Association of said player's release on the date 
thereof, and of said acceptance of his services at or before the ex- 
piration of the ten days aforesaid. 

VI. No Club not a member of either Association party hereto 
shall be entitled to membership in either Association party hereto 
from any city or town in which any Club member of either Asso- 
ciation party hereto is located. Provided that nothing herein con- 
tained shall prohibit any Club member of either Association party 
hereto from resigning its membership in such Association during 
the month of November in any year, and being admitted to mem- 
bership in the other Association, with all rights and privileges 
conferred by this agreement. 

VII. No game shall be played between any Club member of 
either Association party hereto and any other Club that presents 
in its nine any ineligible player. Provided that in case the Club 
employing such ineligible player shall discharge him from its ser- 
vice, Clubs of the Associations parties hereto may thereafter play 
against such Club. 

VIII. No Club shall pay to any of its players for onfe season's 
services a salary in excess of two thousand dollars ; nor shall any 
Club employing a player for any portion of the season pay said 
player for his services at a rate in excess of said maximum of sal. 
ary, nor advance payment for such services prior to the first day 
of April in any year, except a sum of money in the month of 
March sufficient to pay for the transportation of such player from 
his domicile to the city where such Club is located. Provided 
that any player to whom the provisions of this Agreement applies 
whose services are required by any Club member of the Associa- 
tions parties hereto, shall be entitled to receive for his services at 
least one thousand dollars. 

IX. A Board of Arbitration, consisting of three duly ac- 
credited representatives from each of the Associations parties 
hereto, shall convene annually at a place mutually to be arranged, 
and shall organize by the election of a chairman, secretary and 
such other officers and committees as to them shall seem meet 
and proper. They may make, and from time to time revoke, 
alter and repeal all necessary rules and regulations not inconsistent 



3u 



THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT, 



with this Agreement, or with the Constitution of either Associa- 
tion for their meetings, procedure and the general transaction ox 
their business. Their membership on said Board shall be de- 
terminable at the pleasure of their respective appointing Asso- 
ciations upon duly certified notice thereof. A quorum shall 
consist of at least two representatives from each Association, and 
all questions shall be voted upon separately by the respective 
delegations, and no such changes or additions shall be made 
unless concurred in by a majority of the delegates of each 
Association. 

X. In addition to all matters that may be specially referred 
to them by both of the Associations parties hereto, the said 
Board shall have sole, exclusive and final jurisdiction of all dis 
putes and complaints arising under, and all interpretations of this 
Agreement. They shall also, in the interests of harmony and 
peace, arbitrate upon and decide all differences and disputes 
irising between the Associations parties hereto, and between a 
Club member of one and a Club member of the other Association 
party hereto. Provided^ that nothing in this Agreement shall be 
construed as giving authority to said Board to pass upon, alter, 
amend or modify any section or part of section of the Constitution 
of either Association party hereto. 

We hereby certify that the said Associations parties hereto 
have, by a unanimous vote of the Clubs of said Associations, 
idopted, ratified and approved this Agreement: 

N. E. Young, 
President of the National League of Professional B. B. Clubs, 

W. C. WlKOFF, 

President of the American Association of B. B. Clubs, 
March 5, 188S. 



ARTICLES OF QUALIFIED ADMISSION 

TO THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL BASE 
BALL CLUBS. 



The parties of the first part being the parties to the National 
Agreement of Professional Base Ball Clubs (viz.: the National 
League of Professional Base Ball Clubs and the American Asso- 
ciation of Base Ball Clubs), and the parties of the second part 
being such eligible professional or semi-professional associations, 
each with a membership of at least six Base Ball Clubs, as shall 
duly authorize their Presidents to sign this agreement, and whose 
Presidents do sign this agreement in pursuance to said authority, 
do hereby agree each with the other, in consideration of the 
mutual advantages and protections to be derived therefrom, as 
follows: 

I. Each Association constituting one of the parties of the 
second part, when it shall have signed this agreement in pursu- 
ance to authority given its President in accordance with the 
provisions herein, shall be, and each of them is, hereby given and 
afforded the following protection and qualified admission to the 
National Agreement of Professional Base Ball Clubs, and this in 
lieu of all previous contracts made by the parties to the National 
Agreement of Professional Base Ball Clubs with the said parties 
of the second part, or any of them. Provided, however, any 
Association whose membership shall at any time be reduced to 
less than four Clnbs actually engaged in a schedule of champion- 
ship games, shall forfeit all rights and privileges under these 
articles. 

II. On or after the twentieth day of October of each year, the 
Secretary of each Association which is a party of the second part, 
shall forward to the Secretary of each Association party of the 
first part, the names of any and all players then under contract 
who have signed such contracts on or after the twentieth day of 
October, with any of the clubs members of the said Associations, 
parties of the second part, and from and after the receipt of such 
notice, and of notice of all subsequent contracts from such Secre- 
taries, any and all players so reported as being under contract 
with any of the Clubs, members of the Associations, parties of the 

31 



32 



ARTICLES OF QUALIFIED ADMISSION. 



second part, shall, unless released, be ineligible to contract with 
any club member of the parties of the first or second part until 
the 20th day of October then next ensuing; and not then if re- 
served under the provisions of Article X. 

III. Any player who has entered into a contract with any Club 
member of any Association party of the second part may be sus- 
pended without pay by such Club or Association for breach of 
contract or breach of any of the rules of such Association, and he 
shall thereafter be ineligible to sign or play during the remainder 
of the current season with any of the Clubs of the Associations, 
parties to or under the protection of the National Agreement, un- 
less such disability shall have been sooner removed by the Club 
or Association by which he was suspended. 

IV. Any player under contract or reservation, or who shall be 
expelled, blacklisted, suspended or rendered ineligible by either 
of the parties of the first- part or the Board of Arbitration, shall 
be ineligible to sign or play with any of the Clubs, members of 
the Associations parties of the second part herein, and any Club 
who shall knowingly play any such player, either in their Club, or 
shall play against any other Club who has such a player in their 
nine, shall be dismissed from membership by the Association of 
which it is a member, or said Association shall forfeit all rights 
under this Agreement. 

V. Before any Club member of any Association, a party of the 
second part shall contract with a player for an ensuing season, the 
party of the second part of which such Club is or may be a mem- 
ber, shall enact laws or regulations debarring such Club from 
entering into such contract with such player while under arrears 
to him on account of his contract for the current season; also de- 
barring such Club from suspending or otherwise, attempting to 
disqualify a player for refusing to contract with it. Each Asso- 
ciation party of the second part shall also enact laws providing 
for the expulsion of any Club member for refusal to pay arrears 
of salary to a player when thereto required by the Board of Direc- 
tors of said Association, party of the second part, or said Asso- 
ciation shall forfeit all rights under this Agreement. 

VI. Qualified membership of any of the parties of the second 
part shall be forfeited for failing to expel any of its Club mem- 
bers that may play a game of ball, except under the Joint Playing 
ing Rules adopted by the parties of the first part, or that may play 
a game except with a Club member of the parties of the first part 
in any city; or within four miles thereof; wherein is located a Club 
member of the parties of the first part, without the consent of 
said Club. 

VII. It is understood and agreed by and between the parties 
hereto, that any controversy between the Associations, or be- 



ARTICLES OF QUALIFIED ADMISSION. 



33 



tween Clubs of different Associations parties to this Agreement, 
as to any matter or matters herein mentioned, or mentioned in 
the National Agreement, shall be determined by the Board of 
Arbitration without regard to any law or regulation of any party 
hereto, that may be in conflict therewith. 

VIII. It is expressly stipulated that in any case coming before 
the Board of Arbitration involving the forfeiture of any rights or 
privileges of any Association party of the second part, or any 
Club member thereof, the Secretary of the said Board shall 
notify such Association in writing, and on demand of said party 
of the second part said Board shall grant it a hearing on the 
trial of the case, and no adverse verdict shall be rendered by said 
Board against such Association party of the second part, nor 
against any Club member thereof, unless such notice be furn- 
ished, and such hearing, if thereupon demanded, granted. 

IX. Each Association, a party of the second part, shall pay 
to the Secretary of the Board of Arbitration : 

First. — As annual dues the sum of $50, on or before the first 
day of March in each year. 

Second. — Also, if the right of reservation is claimed under 
Article X, the sum of $1,500 if said Association be composed of 
six clubs, or $2,000 if composed of not more than eight clubs,, 
payable on or before the first day of May in each year. 

X. The right of reservation may be claimed by any Associa- 
tion party of the second part by written notice to the Secretary 
of the Board of Arbitration on or before, and not later than the 
first day of March in each year, and said right of reservation will 
be granted under the following conditions : 

First. — The payment of the sum prescribed in Section 2 of 
Article IX, on a date not later than therein designated. 

Second. — That the Secretary of each Association party of the 
second part shall on or before the 10th day of October of each 
year transmit to the Secretaries of both the Associations parties 
of the first part, a reserve list of players not exceeding fourteen 
in number, then under contract with each of the several Club 
members of the Association of which he is Secretary, and such 
players shall thereafter during the ensuing season, unless duly 
released, be ineligible to contract with any Club member of any 
Association party hereto, other than their respective reserving 
clubs. 

Third. — That each Association entitled to the right of reser- 
vation under this Article may be represented at and participate 
in any discussion before the Board of Arbitration, affecting its 
privileges thereunder. 

XI. All contracts or agreements heretofore made between 
the parties are hereby declared null and void. 



REGULATIONS OF THE BOARD OF ARBITRATION. 



. I. The Officers of the Board shall be a Chairman and a Sec- 
retary, who shall also be Treasurer, who shall be elected at the 
regular meeting of the Board to be held in December each year. 
The term of each officer shall be one year, or until his successor 
shall have been elected and qualified, provided that any vacancy 
occurring by resignation or disqualification during the said term 
shall be filled by a majority vote of the Board, which vote may be 
taken by correspondence. 

II. It shall be the duty of the Chairman of the Board of Arbi- 
tration to preside at all its meetings, and he shall call special 
meetings when he may deem it necessary, or when thereto re- 
quested by half of the members thereof. All inquiries as to the 
interpretation of any provision of the National Agreement, or of 
any agreement supplementary thereto, should be addressed to, 
and answered by, the Chairman of the Board. 

III. The Secretary shall have the custody of all official 
records and papers of the Board, shall keep a record of all its 
meetings, and shall issue all official notices. All applications of 
admission to the benefits of the National Agreement should be 
addressed to, and answered by the Secretary of the Board of 
Arbitration. 

IV. The regular meeting of the Board of Arbitration shall be 
held on the Tuesday previous to the second Wednesday in De- 
cember of each year, at such place as the Chairman shall direct. 

THE BOARD OF ARBITRATION, 1888. 



John I. Rogers (National League), Chairman. 

138 South Sixth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

C. H. Byrne (American Association), Secretary and Treasurer. 

Fifth Av. and Fourth St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
U 



ASSOCIATIONS IDENTIFIED WITH THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 35 

N, E. Young (National League), 

P. O. Box 536, Washington, D. C. 

Zach Phelps (American Association), 

Kendall Building, Louisville, Ky. 

John B. Day (National League), 

121 Maiden Lane, N. Y. City. 

Chris. Von der Ahe (American Association). 

St. Louis and Grand Av., St. Louis, Mo. 

ASSOCIATIONS IDENTIFIED WITH THE NATIONAL 
AGREEMENT, MARCH 5, 1888. 



THE NATIONAL LEAGUE OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 

N. E. Young, Pres. and Sec., V. O. Box 536, Washington, D. C. 

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF BASE BALL CLUBS. 

Wheeler C. Wikoff, Pres. and Sec, Columbus, O. 

THE INTER-NATIONAL LEAGUE OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALI 
CLUBS. 

E. Strachan Cox, President, Toronto, Canada. 
C. D. White, Secretary, Utica, N. Y. 

THE WESTERN ASSOCIATION OF BASE BALL CLUBS. 

S. G. Morton, Ptesident and Secretary, Chicago, III. 

NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 

Edwards Cheney, President. Lowell, Mass. 
Edward F. Stevens, Secretary, Boston, Mass. 

THE CENTRAL LEAGUE OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 

John W. Collins, President, Newark, N. J. 
J. C. Kennedy, Secretary \ New York City. 

THE TRI-STATE LEAGUE OF BASE BALL CLUBS. 

W. II . McDermith, President, Columbus, O. 
J. B. K. Connelly, Secretary, Columbus, O. 



">- 



36 ASSOCIATIONS IDENTIFIED WITH THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



THE CENrRAL INTER-STATE LEAGUE OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL 
CLUBS. 

W. H. Allen, President, Rockford, 111. 
A. H. Spink, Secretary, St. Louis, Mo. 

THE TEXAS LEAGUE OF BASE BALL CLUBS. 

Fred. W. Turner, President, Austin, Tex. 
W. L. Reynolds, Secretary, Dallas, Tex. 

THE WESTERN LEAGUE OF BASE BALL CLUBS. 

Wm. McCHntock, President, Denver, Col. 
A. H. Spink, Secretary, St. Louis, Mo. 

THE SOUTHERN LEAGUE OF BASE BALL CLUBS. 

J. T. Wilson, President and Secretary, Birmingham, Ala. 



TisriDEx:. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



RULE. 

The Ground , I 

The Infield 2 

The Bases 3 

The Foul Lines 4 

The Pitcher's Lines 5 

The Catcher's Lines . . 6 

The Captain's Lines 7 

The Players' Lines 8 

The Players' Bench 9 

The Batsman's Lines , . 10 

The Three Feet Lines n 

The Lines Must be Marked . 12 

The Ball 13 

Weight and Size (1) 13 

Number Balls Furnished ■ (2) 

Furnished by Home Club (2) 13 

Replaced if Injured (4) 13 

The Bat.... 14 

FIELD RULES. 

Open Betting and Pool Selling Prohibited 15 

No Person Allowed on Field during Game 16 

Players not to Sit with Spectators 17 

Penalty for Insulting Umpire 18 

Penalty for not Keeping Field Clear . . 19 

Restriction as to Addressing Audience 20 

Number of Players in the Field 2t 

37 



38 



INDEX TO PLAYING RULES. 



THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

RULE, 

Players' Positions 22 

in the Field.. (1) 22 

at the Bat (2) 22 

Order of Batting . (3) 22 

Restriction as to Occupying Catcher's Lines. . .(4) 22 

DEFINITIONS. 

A Fair Ball 23 

An Unfair Ball. 24 

A Balk.. 25 

A Dead Ball 26 

A Block 27 

A Fair Hit 28 

A Foul Hit 29 

A Ball Passing Outside Grounds 30 

A Strike 31 

A Foul Strike 32 

" Play " - 33 

" Time "... 34 

"Game" ■ 35 

An Inning 36 

A Time at Bat 37 

Legal or Legally 38 

THE GAME. 

Number of Innings 39 

Drawn Game 40 

Forfeited Game 41 

M No Game" 41 

Substitute, when Allowed 43 

Choice of Innings 44 

When Umpire Must Call "Play" 45 

Umpire Calls Balls 46 

When Umpire May Suspend Play 46 

" •' '* Terminate Game. 46 

Rain, Effect of, in Terminating Game 46 

Batsman Must Call for Ball He Wants 46 

What Umpire Must Count and Call 46 

When Batsman is Out . . 47 

" " Becomes Base Runner 48 

Base Runner Must Touch Bases in Order 49 

When Entitled to Hold Base 49 

•« " " u Take One Base 50 

M " '• Required to Return to Base. 51 



INDEX TO PLAYING RULES. 



39 



RULE. 

No Substitute Allowed for Base Runner. . . . . 52 

When Base Runner is Out. 53 

When Umpire Shall, without Appeal Declare Player "Out" 54 

When Ball is not in Play until Returned to Pitcher. 55 

Block, Effect of . 56 

Run, when to be Scored 57 

Captain only to Address Umpire 58 

Coaching Restrictions 59 

Umpire's Duties 60 

Fines by Umpire 61 

Reversing Decision 62 

THE UMPIRE. 

Changing Umpire 63 

Duties as to Materials of Game , . 65 

" " Ground Rules 65 

11 Reversal of Decision 65 

Changing Umpire during Game 65 

Expulsion of Umpire 65 

Umpire's Jurisdiction and Powers. , 65 

Umpire to Give Notice of Fine 65 

Forfeited Game 65 

Special Penalties 65 

Scoring Regulations 66 

CONSTITUTION AND AMENDMENTS. 

Amendments of Rules. .„...,♦« . ... 67 



NATIONAL PLAYING RULES 

— OF — 

Professional Base Ball Clubs 

AS ADOPTED JOINTLY BY THE NATIONAL LEAGUE AND 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION, GOVERNING ALL CLUBS PAR- 
TIES TO THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT, 1888. 



THE MATERIALS OF THE GAME. 

Rule i. The Ground must be an inclosed field, sufficient in 
size to enable each player to play in his position as required by 
these Rules. 

Rule 2. The Infield must be a space of ground thirty yards 
square. 

Rule 3. The Bases must be 

(r) Four in number, and designated as First Base, Second 
Base, Third Base and Home Base. 

(2) The Home Base must be of whitened rubber twelve inches 
square, so fixed in the ground as to be even with the surface, and 
so placed in the corner of the infield that two of its sides will form 
part of the boundaries of said infield. 

(3) The First, Second and Third Bases must be canvas bags, 
fifteen inches square, painted white, and filled with some soft ma- 
terial, and so placed that the center of the second base shall be 
upon its corner of the infield, and the center of the first and third 
bases shall be on the lines running to and from second base and 
seven and one-half inches from the foul lines, providing that each 
base shall be entirely within the foul lines. 

(4) All the Bases must be securely fastened in their positions, 
and so placed as to be distinctly seen by the Umpire. 

Rule 4. The Foul Lines must be drawn in straight lines from 
the outer corner of the Home Base, along the outer edge of the 
First and Third Bases, to the boundaries of the Ground. 

40 



PLAYING RULES, 



41 



Rule 5 (Sec. i). The Pitcher's Lines must be straight lines 
forming the boundaries of a space of ground, in the infield, five 
and one-half feet long by four feet wide, distant fifty feet from 
the center of Home Base, and so placed that the five and one-half 
feet lines would each be two feet distant from and parallel with a 
straight line passing through the center of the Home and Second 
Bases. Each corner of this space must be marked by a flat iron 
plate or stone, six inches square, fixed in the ground, even with 
the surface. 

(Sec. 2.) The pitcher shall take his position facing the batsman 
with both feet square on the ground, the right foot on the rear line 
of the " box," his left foot in front of the right, and to the left of 
an imaginary line from his right foot to the center of the home 
base. He shall not raise his right foot, unless in the act of deliver- 
ing the ball, nor make more than one step in such delivery. He 
shall hold the ball, before the delivery, fairly in front of his body, 
and in sight of the Umpire. In the case of a left-handed pitcher 
the above words "left" and "right" are to be reversed. When 
the pitcher feigns to throw the ball to a base he must resume the 
above position and pause momentarily before delivering the ball to 
the bat. 

Rule 6. The Catcher's Lines must be drawn from the outer 
corner of the Home Base, in continuation of the Foul Lines r 
straight to the limits of the Ground back of Home Base. 

Rule 7. The Captain's or Coacher's Lines must be a line fif- 
teen feet from and parallel with the Foul Lines, said lines com- 
mencing at a line parallel with and seventy-five feet distant from 
the catcher's line, and running thence to the limits of the grounds. 
And should the said Captain or Coacher wilfully fail to remain in 
said bounds, he shall be fined by the Umpire five dollars for each 
such offence, except upon an appeal by the Captain from the Um- 
pire's decision upon a misinterpretation of the rules. 

Rule 8. The Player's Lines must be drawn from the Catcher's 
Lines to the limits of the Ground, fifty feet distant from and 
parallel with, the foul lines. 

Rule 9. The Players' Benches must be furnished by the home 
club, and placed upon a portion of the ground outside the Players' 
Lines. They must be twelve feet in length, and must be immov- 
ably fastened to the ground. At the end of each bench must be 
immovably fixed a bat-rack, with fixtures for holding twenty bats ; 
one such rack must be designated for the exclusive use of the 
Visiting Club, and the other for the exclusive use of the Home 
Club. 

Rule 10. The Batsman's Lines must be straight lines forming 
the boundaries of a space on the right, and of a similar space on 
the left of the Home Base, six feet long by four feet wide, extend 



42 



PLAYING RULES. 



ing three feet in front of and three feet behind the center of the 
Home Base, and with its nearest line distant six inches from the 
Home Base. 

Rule ii. The Three Feet Lines must be drawn as follows; 
From a point on the Foul Line from Home Base to First Base, 
and equally distant from such bases, shall be drawn a line on Foul 
(I round, at a right angle to said Foul Line, and to a point three 
feet distant from it ; thence running parallel with said Foul Line, 
to a point three feet distant from the First Base ; thence in a 
straight line to the Foul Line, and thence upon the Foul Line to 
point of beginning. 

Rule 12. The lines designated in Rules 4, 5, 6, 7, 3, 10 and 11 
must be marked with chalk or other suitable material, so as to be 
distinctly seen by the Umpire. They must all be so marked their 
entire length, except the Captain's and Players' Lines, which must 
be so marked for a distance of at least thirty-five yards from the 
Catcher's Lines. 

Rule 13. The Ball.* 

(Section 1 I.) Must not weigh less than five nor more than five 
and one-quarter ounces avoirdupois, and measure not less than 
nine nor more than nine and one-quarter inches in circumference. 
The Spalding League Ball, or the Reach American Association 
Ball must be used in all games played under these rules. 

(Sec. 2.) For each championship game two balls shall be fur- 
nished by the Home Club to the Umpire for use. When the ball in 
play is batted over the fence or stands, on to foul ground out of 
sight of the players, the other ball shall be immediately put into 
play by the Umpire. As often as one of the two in use shall be 
lost, a new one must be substituted, so that the Umpire may at all 
times, after the game begins, have two for use. The moment the 
Umpire delivers the alternate ball to the catcher or pitcher it comes 
into play, and shall not be exchanged until it, in turn, passes out 
of sight on to foul ground. 

(Sec. 3) In all games the ball or balls played with shall be 
furnished by the Home Club, and the last ball in play becomes 

*Tme SFALm.VG League Ball h:is bet n the official ball of the National 
League for the past ten years, and has ayain been adop'.ed for jSSS. It is in 
general use by all the Lading professional, college and amrteur clubs 
throughout the country, and stands without a rival as the best ball made. 

The Spalding Ball has been officially adopted and used exclusively by 
the follow intr associations: 

The National L- ague; Western Association International League: 
Northwestern League; Central League; Western League; New England 
League; N. Y. Inter-state League; Canadian League; Inter-s ate League; 
California League; Central Inler-state League; American College As- 
sociation; N. W. Coljege Association, and nearly all the minor Stat© and 
City leagues throughout the United States and Canada. Beware of coun- 
terfeits ; none genuine without the Spalding Trade Mark on each box and 
ML 



l'LAYING RULES. 



43 



the property of the winning club. Each ball to be used in cham- 
pionship games shall be examined, measured and weighed by the 
Secretary of the Association, inclosed in a paper box and sealed 
with the seal of the Secretary, which seal shall not be broken ex- 
cept by the umpire in the presence of the captains of the two 
contesting nines after play has been called. 

(Sec. 4.) Should the ball become out of shape, or cut or ripped 
so as to expose the yarn, or in any way so injured as to be — in the 
opinion of the Umpire— unfit for fair use, the Umpire, on being 
appealed to by either captain, shall at once put the alternate ball 
into play and call for a new one. 

Rule 14, The Bat. 

(1) Must be made wholly of wood, except that the handle may 
be wound with twine, or a granulated substance applied, not to 
exceed eighteen inches from the end. 

(2) It must be round except that a portion of the surface may 
be flat on one side, must not exceed two and one-half inches in 
diameter in the thickest part, and must not exceed forty-two 
inches in length. 

FIELD RULES. 

Rule 15. No Club shall allow open betting or pool selling up. 
on its grounds, nor in any building owned or occupied by it. 

Rule 16. No person shall be allowed upon any part of the field 
during the progress of the game, in addition to the players in uni- 
form, the manager on each side and the umpire; except such officers 
of the law as may be present in uniform, and such officials of the 
Home Club as may be necessary to preserve the peace. 

Rule 17. Players in uniform shall not be permitted to sea* 
themselves among the spectators. 

RULE iS. The Umpire is the sole judge of play, and is en. 
titled to the respect of the spectators, and any person offering any 
insult or indignity to him, must be promptly ejected from the 
grounds. 

Rule 19. Every club shall furnish sufficient police force upon 
its own grounds to preserve order, and in the event of a crowd en- 
tering the field during the progress of a game, and interfering 
with the play in any manner, the Visiting Club may refuse to play 
further until the field be cleared. If the ground be not cleared 
within fifteen minutes thereafter, the Visiting Club may claim, 
and shall be entitled to, the game by a score of nine runs to none 
(no matter what number of innings have been played). 

Rule 20. No Umpire, Manager, Captain^ or Player shall ad- 
dress the audience during the progress of a game, except in case 
of necessary explanation. 



Ja 



44 PLAYING RULES. 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

RULE 21. The Players of each club in a match game shall be 
nine in number, one of whom shall act as Captain. Every Club 
shall be required to adopt uniforms for its players, and in no case 
shall less than nine men be allowed to play on each side. Each 
player shall be required to present himself upon the field during 
said game in a neat and cleanly condition, but no player shall 
attach anything to the sole or heel of his shoes other than the 
ordinary base ball shoe plate. 

Rule 22. The Players' position shall be 

SECTION i. When in the field (designated *' Fielders" in 
these Rules) such as may be assigned them by their Captain, ex- 
cept that the Pitcher must take his position within the Pitcher's 
Lines, as defined in Rule 5, 

Sec. 2. When their side goes to the bat they must immedi- 
ately seat themselves upon the players' bench and remain there 
until the side is put out, except when batsman or base runner. 
All bats not in use must be kept in the bat racks, and the two 
players next succeeding the batsman, in the order in which they 
are named on the score, must be ready with bat in hand to 
promptly take position as batsman; provided, that the Captain 
and one assistant only may occupy the space between the players' 
lines and the Captain's lines to coach base runners. 

(Sec. 3.) The Batsmen must take their positions within the 
Batsmen's Lines, as defined in Rule 10, in the order in which 
they are named on the score ; which must contain the batting 
order of both nines, and be submitted to and approved by the 
Umpire before the game, and must be followed, except in case of 
disability of a player, in which case the substitute must take the 
place of the disabled player in the batting order. " After the first 
inning the first striker in each inning shall be the batsman whose 
name follows that of the last man who has completed his turn — 
time — at bat in the preceding inning." 

Sec. 4. No player of the side at bat, except when Batsman, 
shall occupy any portion of the space within the Catcher's Lines, 
as defined in Rule 6. 

DEFINITIONS. 

Rule 23. A Fair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher while 
standing wholly within the lines of his position, and facing the 
batsman, the ball, so delivered to pass over the home base, not 
lower than the batsman's knee, nor higher than his shoulder. 

Rule 24. An Unfair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher, 
as in Rule 23, except that the ball does not pass over the Home 
Base, or does pass over the Home Base above the batsman's 
shoulder, or below the knee. 



PLAYING RULES. 



45 



Rule 25. A Balk is 

(Sec. 1.) Any motion made by the Pitcher to deliver the ball 
to the bat without delivering it, and shall be held to include any 
and every accustomed motion with the hands, arms or feet, or po- 
sition of the body assumed by the Pitcher in his delivery of the 
ball, and any motion calculated to deceive a base runner, except 
the ball be accidentally dropped. 

(Sec. 2.) If the ball be held by the pitcher so long as to delay 
the game unnecessarily; or 

(Sec. 3.) Any motion to deliver the ball, or the delivering the 
ball to the bat by the Pitcher when any part of his person is upon 
ground outside of the lines of his position, including all prelim- 
inary motions with the hands, arms and feet. 

Rule 26. A Dead Ball is a ball delivered to the bat by the 
Pitcher that touches the Batsman's bat without being struck at, or 
any part of the Batsman's person or clothing while standing in 
his position without being struck at; or any part of the Umpire's 
person or clothing without first passing the Catcher, 

Rule 27. A Block is a batted or thrown ball that is stopped 
or handled by any person not engaged in the game. 

Rule 28. A Fair Hit is a ball batted by the Batsman, stand- 
ing in his position, that first touches the ground, the First Base, 
the Third Base, the part of the person of a player, or any other 
object that is in front of or on either of the Foul Lines, or (excep- 
tion) batted directly to the ground by the Batsman, standing in 
his position, that (whether it first touches Foul or Fair Ground) 
bounds or rolls within the Foul Lines, between Home and First, 
or Home and Third Bases, without first touching the person of a 
player. 

Rule 29. A Foul Hit is a ball batted by the Batsman, stand- 
ing in his position, that first touches the ground, the part of the 
person of a player, or any other object that is behind either of the 
Foul Lines, or that strikes the person of such Batsman, while 
standing in his position, or (exception) batted directly to the ground 
by the Batsman, standing in his position, that (whether it first 
touches Foul or Fair Ground) bounds or rolls outside the Foul 
Lines, between Home and First or Home and Third Bases, with- 
out first touching the person of a player. 

Rule 30. When a batted ball passes outside the grounds, the 
Umpire shall decide it fair should it disappear within, or foul 
should it disappear outside of the range of the Foul Lines, and 
Rules 28 and 29 are to be construed accordingly. 

Rule 31. A Strike is 

(1.) A ball struck at by the Batsman without its touching his 
bat; or 



4G 



PLAYING RULES. 



(2.) A Fair Ball, legally delivered by the Pitcher, but not struck 
at by the Batsman. 

(3.) Any obvious attempt to make a foul hit. 

RULE 32. A Foul Strike is a ball batted by the Batsman when 
any part of his person is upon ground outside the lines of the 
batsman's position. 

Rule 33. Play is the order of the Umpire to begin the game, 
or to resume play after its suspension. 

Rule 34. Time is the order of the Umpire to suspend play. 
Such suspension must not extend beyond the day of the game. 

Rule 35. Game is the announcement by the Umpire that the 
game is terminated. 

Rule 36. An Innings is the term at bat of the nine players 
representing a Club in a game, and is completed when three of 
such players have been put out as provided in these Rules. 

Rule 37. A Time at Bat is the term at bat of a Batsman. It 
begins when he takes his position, and continues until he is put 
out or becomes a base runner; except when, because of being hit 
by a pitched ball, or in case of an illegal delivery by the Pitcher, as 
in Rule 48. 

Rule 38. Legal or Legally signifies as required by these 
Rules. 

THE game. 

Rule 39. A Game shall consist of nine innings to each con- 
testing nine, except that, 

(1.) If the side first at bat scores less runs in nine innings than 
the other side has scored in eight innings, the game shall then 
terminate. 

(2.) If the side last at bat in the ninth inning scores the win- 
ning run before the third man is out, the game shall then ter- 
minate. 

(3.) If the score be a tie at the end of nine innings to each 
side, play shall only be continued until the side first at bat shall 
have scored one or more runs than the other side, in an equal num- 
ber of innings, or until the other side shall score one more run 
than the side first at bat. 

(4.) If the Umpire calls "Game" on account of darkness or 
rain at any time after five innings have been completed by both 
sides, the score shall be that of the last equal innings played, un- 
less the side second at bat shaH have scored one or more runs than 
the side first at bat, in which case the score of the game shall be 
the total number of runs made. 

Rule 40. A Drawn Game shall be declared by the Umpire 



PLAYING RULES. 



47 



when he terminates a game on account of darkness or rain, after 
five equal innings have been played, if the score at the time is 
equal on the last even innings played; but (exception) if the side 
that went second to bat is then at the bat, and has scored the 
same number of runs as the other side, the Umpire shall declare 
the game drawn, without regard to the score of the last equal 
innings. 

Rule 41. A Forfeited Game shall be declared by the Umpire 
n favor of the Club not in fault, in the following cases : 

(1.) If the nine of a club fail to appear upon the field, or being 
upon the field, fail to begin the game within five minutes after the 
Umpire has called " Play," at the hour appointed for the begin- 
ning of the game, unless such delay in appearing or in commenc- 
ing the game, be unavoidable. 

(2.) If, after the game has begun, one side refuses or fails to 
continue playing, unless such game has been suspended or termi- 
nated by the Umpire. 

(5.) If, after play has been suspended by the Umpire, one side 
fails to resume playing within five minutes after the Umpire has 
called *' Play." 

(4.) If, in the opinion of the Umpire, any one of these Rules is 
willfully violated. 

Rule 42. " No Game" shall be declared by the .Umpire if he 
shall terminate play on account of rain or darkness, before five in- 
nings on each side are completed. 

RULE 43. A substitute shall not be allowed to take the place of 
any player in a game, unless such player be disabled in the game 
then be'i ng played, by reason of illness or injury of the nature or 
extent of which the Umpire shall be sole judge. 

Rule 44. The choice of innings shall be, 

(1.) Given to the Captain of the Home Club, who shall also be 
the sole judge of the fitness of the ground for beginning a game 
after rain, and no game shall be begun later than two hours before 
sunset. 

(2.) In every championship game each team shall be required to 
have present on the field, in uniform, at least one or more players, 
and no player except he be so in uniform shall be substituted for 
any sick or injured player. 

Rule 45. The Umpire must call " Play," at the hour appointed 
for beginning a game. The game must begin when the Umpire 
calls " Play." When he calls " Time," play shall be suspended 
until he calls *' Play" again, and during the interim no player shall 
be put out, base be run, or run be scored. The Umpire shall 
suspend play only for an accident to himself or a player (but in 



48 TLAYING RULES. 

case of accident to a Fielder, Time shall not be called until the 
ball be returned to, and held by the Pitcher, standing in his posi- 
tion), or in case rain falls so heavily that the spectators are com- 
pelled, by the severity of the storm, to seek shelter, in which case 
he shall note the time of suspension, and should such rain continue 
to fall thirty minutes thereafter, he shall terminate the game; or to 
enforce order in case of annoyance from spectators. The Umpire 
shall also declare every '* Dead Ball," "Block," "Foul Hit," 
" Foul Strike," and " Balk." 

Rule 46. The Umpire shall count and call every "unfair ball" 
delivered by the Pitcher, and every ' 'dead ball," if also an unfair 
ball, as a "ball," and he shall also count and call every "strike." 
Neither a "ball" nor a "strike" shall be counted or called until 
the ball has passed the home base. 

Rule 47. The batsman is out: 

(1). If he fails to take his position at the bat in his order of 
batting, unless the error be discovered and the proper Batsman 
takes his position before a fair hit has been made, and in such case 
the balls and strikes called will be counted in the time at bat of the 
proper Batsman. 

(2.) If he fails to take his position within one minute after 
the Umpire has called for the Batsman. 

(3.) If he makes a Foul Hit, and the ball be momentarily held 
by a Fielder before touching the ground, provided it be not caught 
in a Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other than a Fielder 
before being caught. 

(4.) If he makes a Foul Strike. 

(5.) Tf he plainly attempts to hinder the Catcher from fielding 
the ball, evidently without effort to make a fair hit. 

(6). If. while the First Base he occupied by a base runner, three 
strikes be called on him by the Umpire, except when two hands 
are already out. 

(7.) If, while making the third strike the ball hits his person 
or clothing. 

(8.) If, after two strikes have been called, the Batsman obviously 
attempts to make a foul hit as in Section 3, Rule 31. 

Rule 48. The Batsman becomes a Base Runner : 

(1.) Instantly after he makes a Fair Hit. 

(2.) Instantly after five Balls have been called by the Umpire, 

(3.) Instantly after three Strikes have been declared by the 
Umpire. 

(4.) If, while he be a Batsman, his person or clothing be hit by 
a ball from the pitcher, unless — in the opinion of the Umpire — he 
intentionally permits himself to be so hit. 



PLAYING RULES. 



40 



(5.) Instantly after an illegal delivery of a ball by the pitcher. 

Rule 49. The Base Runner must touch each Base in regular 
order, viz.: First, Second, Third and Home Bases; and when 
obliged to return, must retouch the base or bases in reverse order. 
He shall only be considered as holding a base after touching it, 
and shall then be entitled to hold such base until he has legally 
touched the next base in order, or has been legally forced to vacate 
it for a succeeding Base Runner. 

Rule 50. The Base Runner shall be entitled, without being 
put out, to take one Base in the following cases: 

(1.) If, while he was Batsman, the Umpire called five Balls. 

(2.) If the Umpire awards a succeeding Batsman a base on 
five balls, or for being hit with a pitched ball, or in case of an ille- 
gal delivery — as in Rule 48 — and the Base Runner is thereby 
forced to vacate the base held by him. 

(3.) If the Umpire calls a "balk.'* 

(4.) If a ball delivered by the Pitcher pass the Catcher and 
touch the Umpire or any fence or building within ninety feet of 
the Home Base. 

(5.) If he be prevented from making a base by the obstruction 
of an adversary. 

(6.) If the Fielder stop or catch a batted ball with his hat or 
any part of his dress. 

Rule 51. The Base Runner shall return to his Base, and shall 
be entitled to so return without being put out. 

(i.) If the Umpire declares a Foul Hit, and the ball be not 
legally caught by a Fielder. 

(2.) If the Umpire declares a Foul Strike. 

(3.) If the Umpire declares a Dead Ball, unless it be also the 
fifth Unfair Ball, and he be thereby forced to take the next base, 
as provided in Rule 50. (See clause 2.) 

Rule 52. The Base Runner shall not have a substitute run 
for him. 

Rule 53, The Base Runner is out: 

(1.) If, after three Strikes have been declared against him 
while Batsman, and the Catcher fail to catch the third strike ball, 
he plainly attempts to hinder the Catcher from fielding the ball. 

(2.) If, having made a Fair Hit while Batsman, such fair hit 
ball be momentarily held by a Fielder, before touching the ground 
or any object other than a Fielder: Provided, It be not caught in a 
Fielder's hat or cap. 

(3.) If, when the Umpire has declared three strikes on him, 
while batsman, the third strike ball be momentarily held by a 



50 



PLAYING RULES. 



Fielder before touching the ground. Provided, it be not caught 
in a Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other than a Fielder 
before being caught. 

(4.) If, after three Strikes or a Fair Hit, he be touched wi'h 
the ball in the hand of a Fielder before such Base Runner touches 
First Base. 

(5.) If, after three Strikes or a Fair Hit, the ball be securely 
\eld by a Fielder, while touching First Base with any part of his 
person, before such Base Runner touches First Base. 

(6.) If, in running the last half of the distance from Home 
Base to First Base, he runs outside the Three Feet Lines, as de- 
fined in Rule 11; except that he must do so if necessary to avoid 
a Fielder attempting to field a batted ball, and in such case shall 
not be declared out. 

(7. If, in running from First to Second Base, from Second to 
Third Base, or from Third to Home Base, he runs more than 
three feet from a direct line between such bases to avoid being 
touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder; but in case a 
Fielder be occupying the Base Runner's proper path, attempting 
to field a batted ball, then the Base Runner shall run out of the 
path and behind said Fielder, and shall not be declared out for so 
doing. 

(8.) If he falls to avoid a- Fielder attempting to field a batted 
ball, in the manner prescribed in clauses 6 and 7 of this Rule; or 
if he, in any way, obstructs a Fielder attempting to field a batted 
ball, or intentionally interferes with a thrown ball: Provided, That 
if two or more Fielders attempt to field a batted ball, and the 
Base Runner comes in contact with one or more of them, the 
Umpire shall determine which Fielder is entitled to the benefit of 
this Rule, and shall not decide the Base Runner out for coming in 
contact with any other Fielder. 

(9.) If, at any time while the ball is in play, he be touched 
by the ball in the hand of a Fielder, unless some part of his person 
is touching a base he is entitled to occupy; Provided, the ball be 
held by the Fielder after touching him; but (exception as to First 
Base), in running to First Base, he may overrun said base without 
being put out for being off said base, after first touching it, pro- 
vided he returns at once and retouches the base, after which he 
may be put out as at any other base. If, in over-running First 
Base, he also attempts to run to Second Base, or, after passing 
the base he turns to his left from the foul line, he shall forfeit 
such exemption from being put out. 

(10.J If, when a Fair or Foul Hit ball is legally caught by a 
Fielder, such ball is legally held by a Fielder on the base occu- 
pied by the Base Runner when such ball was struck (or the' 



PLAYING RULES. 



51 



Base Runner be touched with the ball in the hands of a Fielder), 
befoie he retouches said base after such Fair or Foul Hit ball was 
so caught. Provided, That the Base Runner shall aot be out in 
such case, if, after the ball was legally caught as above, it be de- 
livered to the bat by the Pitcher before the Fielder holds it on 
said base, or touches the Base Runner with it; but if the Base 
Runner in attempting to reach a base, detaches it before being 
touched or forced out he shall be declared safe. 

(11.) If, when a Batsman becomes a Base Ruuner (except as 
provided in Rule 50), the First Base, or the First and Second 
Bases, or the First, Second and Third Bases, be occupied, any 
Base Runner so occupying a base shall cease to be entitled to 
hold it, until any following Base Runner is put out and may be 
put out at the next base or by being touched by the ball in the 
hands of a Fielder in the same manner as in running to First 
Base, at any time before any following Base Runner is put out. 

(12.) If a fair hit ball strike him before touching a fielder he 
shall be declared out, and in such case no base shall be run unless 
forced by the Batsman becoming a Base Runner, and no run be 
scored. 

(13.) If when running to a base or forced to return to a base, 
he fail to touch the intervening base or bases, if any, in the order 
prescribed in Rule 49, he may be put out at the base he fails to 
touch, or by being touched by the ball in the hand of a Fielder, 
in the same manner as in running to First Base. 

(14.) If, when the Umpire calls "Play," after any suspension 
of a game, he fails to return to and touch the base he occupied 
when "Time" was called before touching the next base. 

Rule 54. The Umpire shall declare the Batsman or Base 
Runner out, without waiting for an appeal for such decision, in 
all cases where such player is put out in accordance with these 
rules, except as provided in Rule 53, clauses 10 and 14. 

Rule 55. In case of a Foul Strike, Foul Hit ball not legally 
caught flying, Dead Ball, or Base Runner put out for being 
struck by a fair-hit ball, the ball shall not be considered in play 
until it is held by the Pitcher standing in his position. 
• Rule 56. Whenever a Block occurs, the Umpire shall declare 
it, and Base Runners may run the bases, without being put out, 
Until after the ball has been returned to and held by the Pitcher 
standing in his position. 

Rule 57. One Run shall be scored every time a Base Runner, 
after having legally touched the first three bases, shall touch the 
Home Base before three men are put out. If the third man is 
forced out. or is put out before reaching First Base, a run shall not 
be scored. 



PLAYING RULES. 



RULE 58. The Captain only may address the Umpire, and 
then only, upon a question of interpretation of the rules. Any 
violation of this rule shall subject the offender to a fine of five 
dollars by the Umpire. 

Rule 59. The Captains and Coachers are restricted in coach- 
ng to the Base Runner only, and are not allowed to address any 
remarks except to the Base Runner, and then only in words of 
necessary direction; and no player shall use language which will, 
in any manner, refer to or reflect upon a player of the opposing 
club, or the audience. To enforce the above the Captain of the 
opposite side may call the attention of the Umpire to the offence 
and upon a repetition of the same the club shall be debarred from 
further coaching during the game. 

THE UMPIRE'S DUTIES. 

Rule 60, The Umpire's duties shall be as follows: 

(1.) The Umpire is the sole and absolute judge f play. In no 
instance shall any person be allowed to question the correctness 
of any decision made by him exeept the Captains of the contend- 
ing nines, and no other player shall at such time leave his position 
in the field, his place at the bat, on the bases or players' bench, to 
approach or address the Umpire in word or act upon such dis- 
puted decision, unless requested to do so by the Umpire. Every 
player violating this provision shall be fined by said Umpire ten 
dollars for each offence. Neither shall any Manager or other 
officers of either club except the Captains as before mentioned — be 
permitted to go upon the field or address the Umpire in regard to 
such disputed decision under a penalty of a forfeiture of the game 
to the opposing club. The Umpire shall in no case appeal to any 
spectator for information in regard to any such case, but may 
ask for information, if he so desires, from one or more of the 
players. 

(2.) Before the commencement of a Match Game, the Umpire 
shall see that the rules governing all the materials of the game are 
strictly observed. He shall ask the Captain of the Home Club 
whether there are any special ground rules to be enforced, and if 
there are, he shall see that they are duly enforeed, provided they 
do not conflict with any of these Rules, He shall also ascertain 
whether the fence in the rear of the Catcher's position is distant 
ninety feet from the Home Base. 

(3.) Incase the Umpire imposes a fine on a player, or declares 
a game forfeited, he shall transmit a written notice thereof to the 
President of the Association within twenty-four hours thereafter, 
under the penalty of having said fine taken from his own salary. 

Rule 61. The umpire's jurisdiction and powers in addition to 
those specified in the constitution and the preceding rules are: 

(1,) He must keep the contesting nines playing constantly from 



PLAYING RULES. 



53 



the commencement of the game to its termination, allowing such 
delays only as are rendered unavoidable by accident, injury or 
rain. He must, until the completion of the game, require the 
players of each side to promptly take their positions in the field 
as soon as the third hand is put out, and must require 
the first striker of the opposite side to be in his position at the bat 
as soon as the fielders are in their places. 

(2) The players of the side "at bat M must occupy the portion 
of the field allotted them, but must speedily vacate any portion 
thereof that may be in the way of the ball, or of any Fielder at- 
tempting to catch or field it. The triangular space behind the 
Home Base is reserved for the exclusive use of the Umpire, 
Catcher and Batsman, and the Umpire must prohibit any player 
of the side "at bat" from crossing the same at any time while 
the ball is in the hands of, or passing between, the Pitcher and 
Catcher, while standing in iheir positions. 

(3) The Umpire is master of the Field from the commence- 
ment to the termination of the game, and must compel the players 
to observe the provisions of all the Playing Rules, and he is hereb) 
invested with authority to order any player to do or omit to do 
any act, as he may deem it necessary to give force and effect to 
any and all of such provisions, and powers to inflict upon any 
player disobeying any such order a fine of not less than five noi 
more than twenty-five dollars for each offence, and to impose a 
similar fine upon any player who shall use abusive, threatening 01 
improper language to the Umpire. 

(4) The Umpire shall at once notify the Captain of the offend- 
ing player's side of the infliction of any fine herein provided for. 

Rule 62. A fair batted ball that goes over the fence at a less 
distance than two hundred and ten feet from Home Base shall 
entitle the Batsman to two bases and a distinctive line shall be 
marked on the fence at this point. The Umpire shall not reverse 
his decision on any point of play upon the testimony of any player 
engaged in the game, or upon the testimony of any bystander. 

Rule 63. The Umpire shall not be changed during the progress 
of a game, except for reason of illness or injury. 

Rule 64. For the special benefit of the patrons of the game, 
and because the offences specified are under his immediate juris- 
diction, and not subject to appeal by players, the attention of the 
Umpire is particularly directed to possible violations of the purpose 
and spirit of the Rules of the following character : 

(1.) Laziness or loafing of players in taking their places in the 
field, or those allotted them by the Rules when their side is at the 
bat, and especially any failure to keep the bats in the racks pro- 
vided for them ; to be ready (two men) to take position as Batsmen, 



54 



FLAYING RULES. 



and to remain upon the Players' Bench, except when otherwise 
required by the Rules. 

(2.) Any attempt by players of the side at bat, by calling to a 
Fielder, other than the one designated by his Captain, to field a 
ball, or by any other equally disreputable means seeking to dis- 
concert a Fielder. 

(3.) Indecent or improper language addressed by a player to 
the audience, the Umpire, or any player. In any of these cases 
the Umpire must promptly fine the offending player. 

(4.) The Rules make a marked distinction between hindrance 
of an adversary in fielding a batted or thrown ball. This has 
been done to rid the game of the childish excuses and claims 
formerly made by a Fielder failing to hold a ball to put out a Base 
Runner. But there may be cases of a Base Runner so flagrantly 
violating the spirit of the Rules and of the Game in obstructing a 
Fielder from fielding a thrown ball that it would become the duty 
of the Umpire, not only to declare the Base Runner "out" (and 
to compel any succeeding Base Runners to hold their bases), but 
also to impose a heavy fine upon him. For example : If the Base 
Runner plainly strike at the ball while passing him, to prevent its 
being caught by a Fielder ; if he hold a fielder's arms so as to dis- 
able him from catching the ball, or if he run against or knock the 
Fielder down for the same purpose. 

(5.) In the case of a "Block," if the person not engaged in 
the game should retain possession of the ball, or throw or kick it 
beyond the reach of the Fielders, the Umpire should call " Time'* 
and require each base runner to stop at the last base touched by 
him until the ball be returned to the pitcher standing in his 
position. 

(6.) The Umpire shall call "Play" at the exact time adver- 
tised for beginning a game, and any player not then ready to 
take the position allotted him, must be promptly fined by the 
Umpire. 

(7.) The Umpire is only allowed, by the Rules, to call " Time" 
in case of an accident to himself or a player, or in case of rain, as 
defined by the Rules. The practice of players suspending the 
game to discuss or contest a decision with the Umpire, is a gross 
violation of the Rules, and the Umpire must promptly fine any 
player who interrupts the game in this manner. 

SCORING. 

Rule 65. In Order to Promote Uniformity in Scoring Cham- 
pionship Games, the following instructions, suggestions and defi- 
nitions are made for the benefit of scorers, and they are required 
to make all scores in accordance therewith. 



PLAYING RULES. 



55 



BATTING. 

(i.) The first item in the tabulated score, after the player's 
name and position, shall be the number of times he has been at 
bat during the game. At any time or times where the player has 
been sent to base by being hit by a pitched ball by the pitch- 
er's illegal delivery, or by a base on balls shall not be included 
in this column. 

(2.) In the second column should be set down the runs 
made by each player. 

(3.) In the third column should be placed the first base hits 
made by each player. A base hit should be scored in the fol- 
lowing cases: 

When the ball from the bat strike the ground between the 
foul lines, and out of reach of the fielders. 

When a hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by a fielder in 
motion, but such player cannot recover himself in time to handle 
the ball before the striker reaches First Base. 

When the ball is hit so sharply to an infielder that he cannot 
handle it in time to put out a man. In case of doubt over this 
class of hits, score a base hit and exempt the fielder from the 
charge of an error, 

When a ball is hit so slowly toward a fielder that he cannot 
handle it in time to put out a man. 

That in all cases where a base runner is retired by being hit 
by a batted ball, the batsman should be credited with a base 
hit. 

That when a player reaches first base through an error ot 
judgment such as two fielders allowing the ball to drop between 
them, the batter shall not be credited with a base hit, nor the 
fielder charged with an error, but it shall be scored as an unac- 
cepted chance, and the batter shall be charged with a time at the 
bat. 

BASK RUNNING. 

(4.) In the fourth column shall be scored bases stolen, and 
shall be governed as follows: 

Any attempt to steal a base must go to the credit of the base 
runner, whether the ball is thrown wild or muffed by the fielder, 
but any manifest error is to be charged to the fielder, making 
the same. If the base runner advances another base he shall 
not be credited with a stolen base, and the fielder allowing the 
advancement is also to be charged with an error. If a base run- 
ner makes a start and a battery error is made, the runner secures 
the credit of a stolen base, and the battery error is scored 
against the player making it. Should a base runner overrun a 



PLAYING RULES. 



base and then be put out, he should receive the credit for the 
stolen base. 

FIELDING, 

(5,) The number of opponents put out by each player shall 
be set down in the fifth column. Where a striker is given out 
by the Umpire for a foul strike, or because he struck out of his 
turn, the put-out shall be scored to the Catcher. 

(6.) The number of times the player assists shall be set down 
in the sixth column. An assist should be given to each player 
who handles the ball in assisting a run out or other play of the 
kind 

An assist should be g ven to a player who makes a play in time 
to put a runner out, even if the player who should complete the 
play fails, through no fault of the player assisting. 

And generally an assist should be given to each player who 
handles the ball from the time it leaves the bat until it reaches the 
player who makes the put out, or in case of a thrown ball, to each 
player who throws or handles it cleanly and in such a way that a 
put-out results, or would result if no error were made by the re- 
ceiver. 

An assist shall be given the Pitcher when the Batsman fails to 
hit the ball on the third strike, and the same shall also be entered 
in the summary under the head of "struck out." 

EARNED RUNS. 

(7.) An earned run shall be scored every time the player reaches 
the home base unaided by errors before chances have been offered 
*o retire the side, but bases on balls though summarized as 
errors, shall be credited as factors in earned runs. 

(8.) An error shall be given in the seventh column for each 
misplay which allows the striker or base runner to make one or 
more bases when perfect play would have insured his being put 
out, except that M wild pitches," "bases on the batsman being 
struck by a pitched ball," or case of illegal pitched ball, balks 
and passed balls, shall not be included in said column. In 
scoring errors off batted balls see Section 3 of this Rule. 

Rule 66. The Summary shall contain: 

(r.) The number of earned runs made by each side. 

(2.) The number of two-base hits made by each player. 

(3.) The number of three-base hits made by each player. 

(4.) The number of home runs made by each player. 

(5.) The number of double and triple plays made by each 
side, with the names of the players assisting in the same. 

(6.) The number of men given bases on called balls, by 
each Pitcher. 



PLAYING RULES. 



57 



{7.) The number of men given bases from being hit by 
pitched balls. 

(8.) The number of men struck out. 

(9.) The number of passed balls by each Catcher, 

(10.) The number of wild pirches by each Pitcher. 

(11.) The time of game. 

(12.) The name of the Umpire. 

AMENDMENTS. 

RULE 67. No Amendment or change of any of these Na- 
tional Playing Rules shall be made, except by a joint commit- 
tee on rules, consisting of three members from the National 
League and three members from the American Association, Such 
committee to be appointed at the annual meetings of each of 
said bodies to serve one year from the twentieth day of Decem- 
ber of each year. Such committee shall have full power to act, 
provided that such amendments shall be made only by an affirm- 
ative vote of the majority of each delegation. 



58 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



Special Meeting of the Board of Directors of the Na- 
tional League of Professional Base Ball Clubs held 
at the Coleman House, Asbury Park, New Jersey, 
Monday, Aug, 15, 1887. 

Meeting called to order at 7 p. m. 

Present : 

N. E. Young, Chairman, and Messrs. Reach and Nimick, 
Directors. 

The Chairman stated that this special meeting had been called 
to consider the appeal of the New York Club from the Umpire's 
decision in awarding game of June 27, 1887, to the Detroit Club. 

After a careful consideration of all the evidence presented, and 
the arguments of Messrs. Day and Gray representing their re- 
spective Clubs, it was unanimously ordered that the appeal of the 
New York Club be allowed, the Umpire's decision set aside, and 
the game played over during the September series. 

The Treasurer was authorized to pay Mr. J. G. Valentine for 
time lost by reason of his injury received while on duty. A vote 
of thanks was unanimously tendered Col. Woodruff for his 
kind and gentlemanly treatment, and generous hospitality. On 
motion adjourned! 

(Signed) N. E. Young, Chairman. 

A. J, Reach, / ~. , 
" W. A. Nimick, \ ***"*"- 

Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors of the Na- 
tional League of Professional Base Ball Clubs held 
at the Fifth Ave. Hotel, New York City, Wednes- 
day, -Nov. 16, 1887. 

Meeting called to order at 10:30 A, M. 

Present : 

N. E, Young, Chairman, and Messrs. Stearns, Nimick, 
Reach and Day, Directors. 

The Secretary presented a tabular statement of Championship 
games won and lost during the season of 1887. On motion the 
following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That the Df.troit Bask Hall Ci.vv, of Detroit, 
MlCH., having won the greatest percentage of games in the 
Championship series, is hereby awarded the League Champion- 
ship of the United States for the year 1887. 

The report of the Treasurer was received and accepted. 

Mr. N. E. Young was re-elected Secretary. 

The Secretary was authorized to pay Mr. J. G. Valentine, 
League Umpire, for time lost by reason of injury received while 
on duty. The Secretary presented an appeal from Mr. B. Gil- 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



50 



LIGAN from the action of the Washington Club, in suspending 
him without pay. On motion the appeal was referred to a Special 
Committee for investigation and report to the Board. 

The communication of the Washington Club in relation to 
division of gate receipts in game played in New York, Sept. 5, 
1887, was, on motion, referred to the League. On motion 
adjourned. 

(Signed) N. K. Young, Chairman. 

" A. J. Reach, 
Jno. B. Day, 
F. K. Stearns, 
W. A. Nimick, 



i 



Directors. 



) 



representing the Boston B. B. Ass'n. 



Club. 



Anntal Meeting of the National League of Professional 
Base Ball Clubs held at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, 
New York City, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 1887. 
Present : 

A. H. Soden and } 

W. ILConant, \ 

F. K. Stearns and } 

Wm. J. Gray, J 

John T. Brush, 

W. A. Nimick and ) 

A. K. Scandrett, J 

R. C. Hewett and ( 

W. F. Hewett, \ 

J. B. Day and ) 

C. T. Dillingham, f 

A. G. Spalding and \ 

J. W. Spalding, \ 

A, J. Reach and [ 

Jno, I. Rogers, \ 

Meeting was called to order by the President at 12:30 p. m. 

On motion the reading of minutes of last meeting was dis- 
pensed with. 

The report of the Board of Directors was received and accepted. 

The Special Committee on Playing Rules submitted their report, 
which was unanimously adopted. 

On motion the rules were suspended and the following resolu- 
tion adopted : 

Resolved, That the following amendment to Rule 43 be adopted, 
subject to the joint assent of the American Association. 

" Two players, whose names shall be printed on the score card 
as extra players, may be substituted at the end of any completed 
innings by either Club, but the player retired shall not thereafter 



Detroit " 

Indianapolis ' 
Allegheny " 

Wash. Nat'l" 

New York Ball 

Chicago 

Philadelphia" 



60 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



participate in the game. In addition thereto a substitute may be 
allowed at any time in place of a player disabled in the game then 
being played, by reason of illness or injury, of the nature and 
extent of which the Umpire shall be the sole judge. Also, that 
Rule 41 be amended as follows : Add the words to the second 
line after the word ' fault ' the following, ' at the request of such 
Club.'" 

The regular order of business being resumed, the League pro- 
ceeded to consider amendments to the League Constitution, pend- 
ing the consideration of which, on motion adjourned to meet on 
the following day. 

Thursday, Nov. 17, 1887. 

Meeting called to order at 11:15 a. m., and proceeded to con- 
sider amendments to the League Constitution, which, as amended, 
were adopted as follows : (See Constitution.) 

Mr. N. E. Young was re-elected President. 

The following named gentlemen were elected Directors, viz. : 

\V. A. Nimick, F. K. Stearns, A. H. Soden and \V. F. 
Hewett. 

Schedule Committee— W. A. Nimick, F. K. Stearns and A. 
J. Reach. 

Board of Arbitration— J no. I. Rogers, J no. B. Day and N. 
E. Young. 

Joint Playing Rules Committee — A. G. Stalding, J. I. 
Rogers and J no. B. Day. 

Special Committee under resolution of November 18, 1SS6, N. 
E. Young, A. G. Spalding and Jno. B. Day. 

On motion the special agreement with Indianapolis was con- 
tinued for one year. 

On motion the President was authorized and instructed to re- 
turn draft to Indianapolis, that was placed in his hands for advance 
money to St. Louis with the understanding that the Indianapolis 
Club will make a just settlement with St. Louis upon satisfac- 
tory evidence being furnished that such advances were made on 
account of salaries for 1S87. 

On motion, the following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That the League members of the Board of Arbitra- 
tion be instructed to vote in favor ^>f permitting the Minor 
Leagues to protect their Clubs and reserve their players under 
such rules and conditions as said Board may deem proper. 

On motion the contract for printing was awarded to Jno. B. 
SAGE, of Buffalo, N. Y. 

On motion the publication of the League book was left in the 
hands of the Secretary. 

The following resolutions were adopted : 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



01 



n 



7 



Resolved, That the next annual meeting be held in New York 
City. 

Resolved, That the sense of the League is, that Section 61 of 
the League Constitution required the payment to the visiting- 
Clubs of fifty (50J per centum of gate admissions during the past 
season on State holidays made so by law prior to the playing of 
games on such days. 

On motion a recess was taken until 8:30 p. M. 

Meeting called to order at 9 r. m. 

Messrs. Ward, Hanlon, and Brouthers were duly admitted 
by invitation to explain the objects of the Association for which 
they claimed recognition. Mr. Ward stated that in order to 
comply with the wishes of the League in giving the objects of the 
Brotherhood and their grievances it would be necessary that they 
first receive recognition as representatives of their organization. 
After argument Mr. Ward stated that the objects of the Brother- 
hood are to protect players in their rights, and to benefit needy 
players in distress. It will not interfere in the punishment of 
those who deserve punishment. We do not propose to interfere 
with the Reserve Rule or Salary question. On motion, the fol- 
lowing resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That the Chairman appoint a Committee of three 
to confer with a Committee of the Brotherhood. The Chairman 
appointed Messrs. Rogers, Spalding and Day as such Com- 
mittee. 

On motion adjourned subject to the call of the Chairman. 

Friday, Nov. 18, 1887. 

Meeting called to order at 3:30 p. m. 

The Committee appointed to confer with a Committee of the 
Brotherhood submitted their report, which was, on motion, ac- 
cepted. On motion, the contract submitted was adopted and 
referred to Mr Jno. I. Rogers for amendment in form, but 
not in substance, with authority to print the same. 

On motion the following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That Mr. J no. I. Rogers be made Solicitor of the 
League, and that a committee of three be appointed by the Chair 
with full power to confer with him and arrange for his services. 

The Chairman appointed Messrs. Spalding, Stearns and 
Brush as such Committee. 

On motion adjourned. 

N. E. YOUNG, 
President and Secretary,, 



62 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



representing the Boston B. IS. Ass'n. 

m X3ETROIT M " 

41 " Indianapolis " " 

" Allegheny B. B. Club. 

M Wash, Nat'la " 

" New York Ball Club. 

' " Chicago " " 

1 " Philadelphia " " 



Special Meeting of the National League of Professional 
B. B. Clubs held at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, New 
York City, Friday, March 2, a. d„ i888. 

Meeting called to order at 12 o'clock M. 

Present ; 
A. II. Soden and j 
W. H. Con ant, \ 
Chas. H. Smith, ) 
Geo. M. Vail, J 

J no. T. Brush and j 
J. H. Martin ) 

J. Palmer O'Neill 
\V. F. Hewett 
Jno. B. Day, 
A. G. Spalding and ) 
J. W. Spalding, \ 
A. J, Reach and ) 
Jno. I. Rogers, ) 

On motion the reading of minutes of last meeting was dis- 
pensed with. 

The report of the Board of Arbitration, as to the phraseology 
of the National Agreement, was received and adopted. 

On motion the resolution of the Board of Arbitration bearing 
upon the time and place for holding the annual meetings was laid 
on the table. 

On motion the regular order of business was suspended. The 
requests of the Washington and Pittsburgh Clubs that they be 
allowed to sell three tickets for one dollar, was not allowed. On 
motion the special agreement entered into with the Philadelphia 
Club, March 3, 1886, was revoked. 

The following amendments to the League Constitution were 
adopted : (See Constitution). A communication was received 
from a Committee of the Brotherhood which was, on motion, 
referred to the former Committee consisting of Messrs. Rogers, 
Day and Spalding. 

The following resolutions were unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, That the League extend greetings to the National 
Base Ball Reporters' Association of America, and invites 
the hearty co-operation and suggestions of the latter in re-arrang- 
ing the scoring rules. 

Resolved \ That the Schedule Committee shall be selected by 
the President at each annual meeting, one from each of three 
different club members, and the said selection shall be made alter- 
nately from the several clubs of the League. 

Section 56 of the League Constitution, so far as it relates to 



OFFICERS AND FLAYERS. 



03 



the number of games, was unanimously suspended Lor one year 
and "twenty" substituted for "eighteen" games. 

The Schedule Committee submitted its report, which was 
adopted. 

On motion adjourned. 

N. E. YOUNG. 
President and Secretary. 



OFFICERS AND PLAYERS. 

The following is an official list of the officers of the National 
League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, and officers and players 
of clubs, members thereof, for the season of i88S, so far as com- 
pleted to March, 1888. 

N. E. YOUNG, Pres. and Sec, Box 536, Washington, I). C. 

DIRECTORS. 

"NY. A. Nimick, F. K, Stearns, A. H. SoDENandW. F. Hewett. 

BOSTON BASE BALL ASSOCIATION OF BOSTON, 
MASS. 



A. H. Soden, President, J 

No. 116 Water St, 
Hornung, Jos. Sowders, Wm. 

Madden, M. J. Kelly, M. J, 

Johnston, R. F. ■ Tate, E. C. 



B. BILLINGS, Treasurer, 
Box 1756. 
Brown, Thos. T. 
Burdock, J no. J . 



CHICAGO BALL CLUB OF CHICAGO, ILL. 



A. G. Spalding, President, 
No. 10S Madison St. 



Anson, A. C. 

Pfeffer, F. 

Van Haltren, Geo. E. Hoover, C. E 

Williamson, E. N. Darling, Dell. 

Krock, Gustav A 

Baldwin, Mark. 

Sullivan, M. C. 



Burns, Thos. E. 
Sprague, Chas. W. 



Clarke, Wm. H. 
Farrell, Chas. A. 
Brynan, C. R. 



John A. Brown, Secretary^ 
Vo. 16s Loomis St. 



Ryan, Jas. 
Duffy, Hugh. 
Flint, F. S. 
Pettit, R. H. 
Daily, T. 
Tebeau, Oliver. 



DETROIT BASE BALL ASSOCIATION OF DETROIT. 
. MICH. 

CHAS. II. SMITH, President. Robt. H. LeaDLEY, Secretary. 

W H. Watkins, Manager. 
Beattin, E. A. Ganzell, C. W. Springer, Edw. E. 

Broughton, Cal. Twitchell, L. Thompson, Sam'l E 

Gruber, Henry. Sutcliffe, E. E. Conway, P. J. 

Getzein, Chas. H, 



G4 



OFFICERS AND PLAYERS. 



NEW YORK BALL CLUB OF NEW YORK CITY. 

J NO. B. Day, President, No. 121 Maiden Lane. 

Gilbert. Crane, Edward N. Foster, E. E. 

Hatfield. Slattery, M. J. Cleveland, E. E. 

PHILADELPHIA BALL CLUB OF PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Albert J, Reach, President, John J. Rogers, Secretary % 

No. 1022 Market St. No. 138 South Sixth St..' 

Harry Wright, Manager, No. IQ41 A 7 ". 22d St. 
Gleason, Win. Clements, John T. Sanders, A. B. 

Hoover, Wm. J. Schriver, Wm. Mulvey, Jos. 

Bast tan, Chas*. Childs, C. L. McGuire, Jas. 

Irwin, A. A. Kelly, Chas. Tyng, Jas. A. 

Hall man, Wm. 



ALLEGHENY BASE BALL CLUB OF PITTSBURH, PA. 

W. A. NlMlCK, President, A. K. Scandrett, Secretary, 

No. 22 Ross St. Sket iff's Office. 

H. B. Phillips, Manager. 



Barkley, S. W. 
Sunday, W. A. 
Miller, Geo. F. 
Morris, Fdw. 
Carroll, F. H. 



Dunlap, Fred. 
Hendersorl, Hardie. 
Coleman, J. F. 
Dalrymple, A. 



Galvin, J. F. 
Maul, Albert. 
Farmer, Wm. 
Kuehne, W. J. 



WASHINGTON (NATIONAL) BASE BALL CLUB OF 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

R. C. Hewett, President, L. E. Burket, Secretary, 

No. 122J Seventh St., N. IV'. 
Hoy, W. E. Deasley, Thos. O'Brien, Wm. 

Wilmot, Walter. Mack, Connie. Shoch, Geo. 

O'Day, Henry, Murray, M. J, Gilmore, F. T. 

Irwin, John. Gardner, F. Dailey, E. M. 

INDIANAPOLIS BASE BALL ASSOCIATION OF 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



John T. Brush, President. 
Boyle, Henry J. Moffet, S. W. 

Esterbrook, T. J. Bassett, C. E. 
Hines, Paul A. Shreve, L. L. 



H. L Spence, Manager, 
Buckley, R. D. 
Healy, Jno. 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



65 



THE LEAGUE AVERAGES FOR 1887. 

The following are the official averages of the players of the eight League 
Clubs of 1887, giving the names of Flayers who took part in fifteen 
championship contests or more during the season. 

BATTING AVERAGES. 



NAME. 



Maul.. 

Aneon 

Broutherg.., 
Ferguson.., 

Darling 

Thompson., 

Kelly 

Shomherg, . 
Connor. . ... 

j Wise 

"j Carroll 

j Ward , 

"j Williamson, 

Mines.. 

Nash , 

i Fogarty 

■j Mclvinnon.. 

( Evving , 

( Richardson, 

< Bennett 

( Rowe 

Deasley.... 

Sunday 

Ryan , 

\ McGuire 

*( Andrews .,, 

Twitchell... 
( Glasscock.., 
(Rainy 

Gore 

Baldwin. . , . 

j Farrar 

} O'Kourke... 

Whitney..., 

Wood 

White , 

( Tiernan ..., 

< Denny 

(Shindle...., 

Irwin 

j Sullivan.. . 
1 Co eman. . . , 



CLUB. 



Philadelphia. 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Philadelphia. 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Boston 

Indianapolis. 
New York... 

Boston 

Pittsburg 

New York... 

Chicago 

Washington , 

Boston 

Philadelphia. 

Pittsburg 

New York.... 

Detroit 

it 

41 

New York, . . . 
Chicago 

Philadelphia! 

Detroit.. 
Indianapolis. 
New York 

Detroit...!/.; 
Philadelphia. 
New York.... 

Pittsburg 

Philadelphia, 

Detroit 

New York... 
Indianapolis. 

Detroit 

Philadelphia. 

Chicago 

Pittsburg.... 



16 71 

122570 
69 2'J8 

:js n;:i 
1H7 o1C> 



150. 



10? 

163 

66 

87 
118 
llfl 

91 
113 

95 

71 
113 

77 

112 

85 

81 
180 

26 
184 

18 

n 

117 

Ids 

43 

Ul 
5 

95 

IS 

68 

73 

66 
lis 



9: J 32 
87 



04 2t)7 
81 is:, 

8tr20 ( J 
8G|l8? 

70 174 
S7 2i:j 
fiu l'ti) 
67'195 
S3 192 
81211 
521 70 
06 121 
08 :HW 
50, (i'J 
209 
46 



0.31 
0.22 
0.27 
0.18 
50 
0.17 
0.73 
0.18 
0.34 
0.39 
0.22 
0,86 
0.3B 
46|0,37 
49 0.41 
0.80 



0,12 

0.47 
0.24 
0.15 
0.18 
0.07 
0.70 
0.39 
0.07 
0.54 
0.18 
0.61 
0.00 
0.35 
0.16 
0.21 
0.44 
0.08 
0.17 
17 
0.27 
0.24 
0.65 
0.18 
0.30 
0.31 



66 



BASIC HALL GUIDE. 

Batting Record. — Continued. 



NAME. 



Richardson., 

Mo. rill 

Sutton 

I Seery 

( Duniap 

Pfeffer 

Whitney 

Kahne , 

Conway 

j Barns 

) Mulvey , 

H anion , 

Wheelock. .. 

Miller 

O'Brien 

Myera 

j Clements 

I Gardner,...., 

( Burdock 

) Madden , 

Kreig 

Petti! 

Dalrymple... 

Hornung .... 

( Fields 

1 Daily 

Radbourne . , 

Bufflnton — 

Dorgan 

SchocK 

( Gunning.. . . 

^Keefe 

f Gillespie .... 

j Bark ley 

iDealy 

Ganzell 

Myers 

Johnston 

Flint 

Clarkson 

j Van Haltren. 
] McGeachy... 

Briody 

Carroll 

Bastlan. 

( Beecher 

■(Welch 

(Hackett 

Tate 

Bassett 



CLUB. 



New York 

Boston 

Indianapolis.. 

Detroit 

Chicago 

Washington .. 
Pittsburg... ... 

Boston 

Chicago 

Philadelphia.. 

Detroit 

Boston 

Pittsburg 

Washington .. 

Philadelphia!! 
Indianapolis.. 

Boston 

it 

Washing! >n .. 

Chicago 

Pittsburg 

Boston 

Pittsburg 

Phila. & Wash 

Boston 

Philadelphia.. 
New York.... 
Washington .. 
Philadelphia.. 

New York 

ii 

Pittsburg.. !.! 

Washington .. 

Detroit 

Indianapolis.. 

Boston 

Chicago 

Indianapolis.. 

Detroit 

Washington .. 
Philadelphia., 
Pittsburg. .. 

New York 

Indianapolis.. 

Boston 

Indianapolis.. 



64 297 

123 513 
5-2 21!" 



92 408 

97 151 
39171 

105 443 
4S 1 85 
66 280 
71 2',* 
09 285 
27|l09 
56211 
74,30: 
90 370 
56*20 
T5 235 
66 257 

121 511 
481191 
61 226 
44 183 
99 410 
32 137 



55 228 
1191477 



0.64 161 
79 0.63 175 
57 0.77 108 
1040.85 1' 



60=0.93 

95 0.77 

29 , 0.55 

68.0.67 

21 0.51 

57 0.49 

94 0.86 

790.66 

3()i).6s 

57 0.65 

70 0.62 

45,0.43 

48 0.76 

8,0.44 

33 0.51 

23U.62 

9,0.37 

290.90 

43 0.46 

HI n. 86 

0.69 

0.55 

0.50 

0.5 

0.5' 

0.6S 

0.81 

0.52 



40,0.54 
430.4 

33 0.59 
40,0.72 
25 0.38 
88|0. 
22 0,-15 
40;0.65 
290.65 
49 0.49 
22 0.68 
79 0.78 

34 0.56 

15 0.37 

16 0.40 
12 0.2! J 
30,0,51 
4U0.34 






.33 J 

.331 

.327 

.326 

.326 

.325 

.324 

.322 

.320 

.31 

.317 

.316 

.314 

.313 

.310 

.308 

.306 

.3fi6 

.305 

.31)5 

.301 

.3! H 

.3ni) 

.2!-!) 

.298 

.29- 

,2!)7 

,896 

,2:0 
,294 

,<m 

.293 

,298 

.286 
.286 
.2S5 
,2Sl 
.28: 1 
.2*2 
,2?J 
,27> 
.218 
.277 
,276 
.275 
.272 
.272 
.272 
.271 
.270 



1.72 
2.02 
1.94 
1.79 
2.25 
1.98 
1.88 
1.77 
1.38 
1.65 
1.15 
1.64 
1.47 
1.G7 
2.08 
1.43 
1.63 
1.44 
1.29 
1.43 
1.87 
1.84 
1.67 
1.77 

1.6-1 

1.72 

1.33 
1.51 
1.42 
1.42 
1.55 
1.72 
1.54 
1.36 
1.35 
1,45 
1.30 
1.71 
1.70 
1.60 
1.45 
1.40 
1.40 
1.58 
1.35 

i.eo 

1 . 37 
1.39 
1.27 
1.33 



0.33 
0.15 
0,23 
0.39 
0.23 
0.46 
0.19 
0.16 
0.12 
0.27 
0.39 
0.58 
0.45 



330.38 

11 0.09 

18 0.17 

0.11 

0.39 

0.29 

0.16 

0.08 

0.50 

0.31 

0.42 

0.18 

0.25 

o0.12 

8 0.13 

22'0.31 

29,0.42 

18,0.66 

2 0.04 

370.60 



0.06 
0.64 
0.05 
0.89 
0.42 
14 
0.09 
0.27 
0.27 
0.18 



40 39 
18 
0,20 
05 
0,09 
0.12 
0.21 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL 

Batting Record. — Continued. 



07 



87 



NAME. 



< Shaw , 

\ Daily 

Farrell 

£mith 

Brown 
j Polhemus... 
| McLaughlin 

Brown 

McCorniick. 

Conway 

Murphy....,, 

O'Day 

Gilligan , 

Baldwin, ..,, 

( Boyle 

\ Getzelo , 

Arundel 

Cahill 

( Morris 

\ Donnelly... 

ORourke... 

IGalvin 

-(Mack , 

( Weidman.. 

Daily 

j McCarthy..., 
j Tebeau 

Healy 

Caeey , 

Gilmore...., 



CLUB. 



Washington .. 
Chicago..... .. 

Washington ., 

Pitt«bug 

New York 
Indianapolis.. 
Philadelphia.. 
Ind. <fc Pitts.. 

Pittsburg 

Detroit.. 

New York..., 
Washington .. 

Chicago. '., 

Indianapolis.. 

Detroit 

Indianapolis., 

PittBburg.. 
Washington., 

Boston 

Pittsburg , 

Washington . , 
Det. &N. Y., 

BoBton 

Philadelphia., 

Chicago ., 

Indianapolis., 
Philadelphia.. 
Washington .. 











CD 




«a 


m 


a) 


3 


m 


pq 




© 


a> 




cd 


EG 


h 
cp 






V 


m 






d 


B 






en 


O 


P. 


K 


<j 


£ 


21 


78 


7 


0.32 


21 


74 


278 


45 


0.60 


75 


86 


359 


40 


0.46 


95 


122 


4Sh 


70 


0.57 


12S 


47 


ISO 


17 


0.: J ,6 


47 


19 


77 


6 


0.31 


20 


50 


21*; 


25 


0,50 


56 


82 


352 


51 


0.62 


91 


86 


13S 


9 


0,25 


35 


24 


97 


16 


0.66 


21 


16 


r.7 


■i 


0.25 


14 


31 


123 


10 


0.21) 


30 


27 


95 


i 


0.26 


23 


40 


1 (9 


18 


0.45 


86 


41 


1 50 


17 


41 


36 


43 


166 


19 


44 


40 


43 


165 


13 


0,30 


39 


6* 


in 


22 


31 


63 


37 


m 


15 


40 


30 


117 


u\ 


51 


0.43 


101 


21 


B5 


12 


57 


19 


49 


195 


ia 


0.26 


43 


80 


322 


;>. 


0.43 


71 


21 


80 


li 


0.52 


19 


33 


129 


n 


0.33 


28 


18 


--■.> 


7 


0.38 


15 


20 


72 


8 


0.40 


15 


40 


112 


11 


0.35 


28 


44 


170 


21 


0.47 


33 


27 


1(H) 


■1 


0.15 


13 



.269 
.269 
.264 
.263 
.261 
.259 
.259 
.258 
.253 
.247 
.245 
.244 
242 
211 
.240 
210 
.236 
.231 
229 
1229 
.223 
.220 
.220 
.220 
.21 
.208 
.208 
.197 
194 
130 



23 1.01 

98 1.-2 



1.49 
1.31 
1.14 
1.10 
1.5- 
1.36 
1 16 
1 41 
0.93 
0.97 
1.03 
1.27 
1.22 
1.28 
1.00 
1.07 
0.94 
1.10 
1.04 
1.11 
1.01 
0.95 
1.00 
1.00 
0.85 
02 
0.88 
0.48 



5 



1 0.01 

29;0.39 
31 

ao 

10 

4 

2 
21 





1 

2 

2 

•i 

2 

2 

8 
31 

1 
42 

4 

6 
28 

6 

15 

8 

7 
1 
2 



0.36 
0.24 
0.21 
0.21 
0.04 
0.25 
0.00 
0,00 
0.06 
0.06 
0.07 
0.10 
0.05 
0,04 
0.18 
0.50 
0.02 
0.35 
0.19 
0.10 
0.32 
0.27 
0.21 
0.83 
0.40 
0.17 
0.02 
0.07 



A 



fiS BASE BALL GUIDE. 

THE OFFICIAL AVERAGES OF 1887. 

The following are the official statistics of the League season of 
1887, prepared by President Young. 

FIELDING AVERAGES. 

Of Players who have taken part In fifteen or more championship games. 

SEASON OF 1887. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 



NAME. 



Morrill 

Barkley ... 

Conner 

McKinnon. 

Farrar 

Anson 

O'Brien.... 
Brouthers.. 
Shomberg.. 

Carroll 

Kreig 



CLUB. 



Boston 

Pittsburg 

New York 

Pittsburg...... 

Philadelphia,, 

Chicago , 

Washington.. 

Detroit 

Indianapolis. 
Pittsburg.... 
Washington. . 



120* 
55' 
1335 
488 
1149 
123! 
1108 
1189 
1216 
173 
137 



126' 
58-1 
13U9 
525 
1233 
1338 
lltiii 
1262 
Iffifl 
195 
147 



bfl< 



.979 
.978 
.977 
.977 
.973 
.972 
.969 
.957 
.933 
.932 





SECOND BASEMEN 


. * 










1 




Detroit 


61 
25 
62 
119 
108 
39 
123 
88 
38 
78 
37 
64 
50 
32 
18 


208 

59 

219 

273 

257 

79 

393 

225 

70 

193 

112 

177 

110 

83 

89 


217 

67 
215 

414 
384 
128 
402 
298 
131 
246 
114 
18S 
156 
105 
58 


21 
7 
27 
53 

50 
18 
72 
49 
20 
44 
25 
41 
33 
35 
18 


446 
133 
461 

740 

tm 

225 
867 
572 
221 
483 
251 
406 
299 
223 
115 


.953 


» 


Ferguson 


Philadelphia 

Detroit 

Indianapolis 

New York 


947 


3 
4 

5 


Richardson 

Bassett 

Richardson 

Bastian 


.911 

.928 


5 


Philadelphia 

Chicago 


9?0 


7 


pfeffer 


916 


B 


Smith 


Pittsburg 


914 


u 


Farrell 

Myers 

Barkley 


Washington 


909 


10 


« fc 


90H 


11 


Pittsburg 


900 


\9 


Burdock 


Boston . 


R99 


13 


McLaughlin 

( Kelly 


Philadelphia 

Boston 

N*»w York 


.889 
H43 


14 


) Ewing 


.813 



THIRD BASEMEN. 



1 


Whitney. .. 


Pittsburg 


119 
116 
114 
107 
20 
115 
109 
51 
106 
17 
36 
19 


166 

201 

204 

168 

24 

136 

123 

76 

133 

17 

46 

24 


237 

262 

236 

246 

42 

275 

197 

101 

225 

26 

50 

28 


33 
58 
58 
61 
10 
63 
50 
28 
64 
8 
18 
11 


436 
521 
498 
475 

76 
474 
870 
205 
422 

51 
114 

63 


9*4 


f 


Denny 


Indianapolis 

Bopton 

Chicago 


888 


? 


Nash 


883 


4 


Burns 


871 


5 


Tebeau 


« h 


86H 


6 


Donnelly 

Mulvey 


Washington 


867 


7 


Philadelphia 

New York 


864 


8 


Ewing 


863 


9 
10 


White 

Ralney 


Detroit. 

New York 


.848 
843 


11 


O'Rourke 


it 


842 


12 


Shindle 


Detroit.. 


.825 



NAME. 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

SHORT STOPS. 



Smith 

Ward.... .. 

Bastian 

j Glasscock.. 
I Rowe 

Irwin 

Williamson 

Kuhne 

( button 

} Wheelook.. 

Farrell 

Wise 

Dealy 

Mvers 

Gillespie . 

Richardson 

Ftelds 

Hornung... 
jO'Routke... 
} Johnston... 

Fogarty ... 

Beecher. 

Thompson. 

Vanllaltren 

Hanlon 

Andrews... 

Carroll 

Dalrymple. 

Coleman... 

Schock 

McGeachy.. 

Seery 

Gore 

Ilines 

Pettft 

Sutton 

Wood 

Dorgan 

Twlichell... 

Tiernan 

Brown. 

Wheelock. . 

Ryan 

Darling... , 

Kelly 

Sullivan 



CLUB. 



Pittsburg , 

New York. . 
Philadelphia. 
Indianapolis. 

Detroit 

Philadelphia. 

Chicago. 

Pittsburg , 

BoBton 



Washington... 

Boston." 

Washington... 



IB 

9 

| 


o 

"3 


60 

S3 
m 

m 


03 
H 

o 

H 

N 


m 

a 

a) 


M 

a> 

£> 

a 


< 
CD 

B 


to 
a 

"3 


6 


% 


crl 


£ 


34 


71 


119 


16 


129 


2'26 


469 


61 


17 


20 


44 


6 


181 


211 


493 


73 


128 


119 


377 


51 


99 


178 


301 


58 


127 


133 


361 


61 


91 


136 


310 


59 


34 


109 


172 


39 


17 


33 


68 


14 


48 


91 


156 


35 


70 152 


233 


58 


20! 33 


51 


17 


27| 51 


93 


33 



OUTFIELDERS. 



New Yoik... 

Detroit 

Pittsburg 

Boston 

New York 

Boston 

Philadelphia, 

Pittsburg 

Detroit 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Philadelphia. 
Washington.. 
Pittsburg 



Washington , 
Indianapolis. 



New York... 
Washington.. 

Chicago .. 

Boston 

Philadelphia. . 

New York 

Detroit 

New York.... 
Pitts and Ind. 

Boston.. , 

Chicago...... 

Boston ., 

Chicago 



si 



.919 

.914 
.906 
,906 



.883 
.878 
.878 
.875 
443 .8 



831 
.813 



74 


91 


14 


6 


58 


Id'.) 


8 


8 


23 


54 


4 


4 


97 


192 


23 


15 


29 


60 


7 


5 


124 


332 


31 


27 


120 


273 


39 


27 


40 


84 


12 


9 


127 


217 


24 


24 


26 


:;- 


3 


4 


118 


264 


18 


30 


99 


203 


18 


•01 


101 


115 


19 


18 


92 


1*4 


14 


22 


114 


214 


17 


26 


62 


115 


15 


15 


*7 


231 


22 


30 


122 


220 


25 


30 


111 


221 


20 


30 


109 


180 


14 


25 


:J2 


36 


9 


a 


18 


21 





8 


105 


155 


10 


24 


69 


128 


6 


20 


fi2 


82 


3 


13 


101 


150 


10 


25 


82 


188 


is 


33 


23 


85 


1 


6 


120 


164 


33 


33 


2<) 


16 


7 


4 


55 


71 


11 


15 


115 


189 


10 


86 



1111.946 
1251.936 
625.935 
230 j. 934 

72L930 
390,. 930 
339 j .920 
10? .914 
265 909 

42 .904 
312 .903 
245 .902 
182 .901 
220 .900 
257 .898 
115 .896 
281 .894 
215 .890 
271!. 883 



.885 
.882 
.875 
.873 
.870 
.86T 
.864 
.861 
.857 
.855 
.851 
.850 
.846 



J 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Fielders' A verages — Continued. 



NAME. 



Miller 

Daily.... . 

Carroll..,, 

Cahill 

Wise , 

Snnday... 
Buffinton 
Polhemus 



CLUB. 



Pittsburg 

Pbita. and Wash 

PittBburg 

Indianapolis 

Breton,. 

Chicago 

Philadelphia 

Indianapolis .. 





« 


6D 






T3 


o 


a 




a> 


£ 








O 


b 


o 






p 


03 


P* 




Uj 


a! 


Ph 


u 

0) 


< 


p 


O 


<d 

i 

3 




B 




O 


O 


£ 


H 


£ 


H 


15 


32 


4 


7 


43 


98 


140 


IB 


30 


is:; 


41 


96 


9 


21 


126 


52 


SI 


11 


20 


115 


26 


39 


7 


10 


56 


4R 


78 


4 


25 


107 


in 


25 


3 


9 


37 


19 


21 


8 


10 


39 



3 

P* 
d< 



.S37 
.836 
.833 
,826 
.821 
.766 
.755 
.746- 



CATCHERS' AVERAGES. 



NAME. 



Bennett 

Tate 

Clements.... 

(Ganzell 

1 Daily 

Briody 

Flint 

Murphy., 

Gunning 

Miller 

Brown 

Myers 

Barling 

Dealy 

Mack 

j McGuire 

j Ilackett. . . . 

O'ltourke 

(Daily 

1 Kelly 

Carroll 

Deaf? ley 

O'Roufke.... 

Gilligan 

Arundel 







P 


ta 


to 






•d 




T3 


O 


d 






CD 


CD 


CLUB. 


CD 

m 

1 


d 

u 

CD 

B 
p 


CD 
*0Q 

CD 
< 

m 

CD 

a 


u 
W) 

d 


la 
M 
■d 

m 

8 


O 

d 

a 

o 

3 

o 


P* 

% 

CD 




o 


"A 


H 


fc< 


Ell 


H 


CLc 


Detroit 


46 
50 


198 

198 


51 
102 


10 
25 


16 

24 


275 
349 


905 


Boston 


.859 


Philadelphia 


58 


319 


79 


27 


40 


465 


.856 


Detroit 


50 


273 


69 


38 


21 


401 


.854 


Chicago 


65 


354 


148 


40 


47 


589 


.852 


Detroit 


32 

46 

16 


136 
255 

83 


51 

73 
28 


21 
2-1 
12 


12 
37 

11 


220 
391 
134 


KM 


Chicago. 


R3R 


New York 


,828 


Philadelphia 


27 


133 


55 


21 


20 


229 


H21 


Pittsburg. 


71 


265 


62 


28 


46 


401 


.815 


New York 


45 


881 


74 


23 


51 


879 


.804 


Indianapolis 


47 


176 


58 


17 


44 


29: 


.793 


Chicago.. 


18 
27 


117 
110 


37 
45 


17 
14 


24 
28 


195 
197 


7H9' 


Washington 


.786 


** 


73 


3*9 


126 


55 


88 


658 


.782 


Philadelphia 


40 


212 


57 


34 


42 


345 


.779- 


Indianapolis 


39 


128 


52 


20 


31 


231 


.779 


Boston. 


19 
33 
22 
39 
24 


80 
125 

80 
172 

92 


28 
44 
35 
33 
32 


15 
21 
15 
27 
20 


16 
29 
19 
37 

19 


189 

219 

119 
269 
163 


777 


i< 


771 


ti 


771 


Pittsburg 


76* 


New York 


.760 


ti 


37 


137 


66 


18 


47 


2VA 


.757 


Washington 


21 


88 


40 


16 


28 


17 


.744 


Indianapolis 


42 


153 


64 


32 


48 


297 


.730 



\ 



SrALDlNC. S OFFICIAL 



71 



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73 



THE VETERANS OF THE LEAGUE. 

BATTING AVERAGES OF PLAYERS WHO HAVE TAKEN PART IN 
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES FOR SIX OR MORE SEASONS 1876 
TO 1887, BOTH INCLUSIVE. 



NAME. 



s 

« 
1 

2 
3 
4 

5 
6 

7 

8 
9 

10 
11 

12 

13 

11 



Dennis Brouthers. 

Adrian C. Anson.. 

Rodger Connor... 

M. J.Kelly 

Geo. P. Gore 

James OMiourke.. 

[Paul A. Hines 

J James l. White... 

II irdy Richardson 

J. C. Howe 

A. Dalrymple 

Wm. Ewing , 

> Joseph Start. 

[Fred l>unlap.. 

E. B. Sutton. 

) John W. Glasscock 

VGeo. A.Wood 

f Sam W.Wise 

j George Shaffer 

J-Thomns Burns 

Chas. W. Bennett. . 

P. Gillespie 

M. C. Dorgan 

I E. N. Williamson., 
[•Jno. A. Peteis.... 
\ Jno. E Clapp , 

John F. Morrill 

Jas. E. Whitney.... 

Joseph Hornung.., 

(Thomas York 

(Robert Ferguson.., 

Edwin Hanlon , 

(Jeremiah Denny.... 
y Jno. M. Ward 



TJ 


T3 






V 


W 






K 


t>> 




CO 


cj 


(S 






Oh 


pt, 


"3 


w 


O ® 




"3 


CD 

CO 

oJ 

m 


a* 


,0 oJ 


BD 


BO 


CD 

a 




pyj 


p 


U 


A 


A 


B 


fa 


8 


716 


3056 


107 


12 


1039 


43K9 


1574 


8 


809 


3389 


1169 


10 


925 


393' 


1281 


y 


822 


3435 


1101 


1a 


1026 


112< 


14 7 


12 


1052 


tr,99 


1417 


12 


»76 


108.3 


12S2 


9 


853 


3708 


1153 


8 


782 


3097 


942 


10 


858 


381* 


1148 


* 


537 


2-J93 


685 


11 


776 


3300 


995 


7 


626 


26.-,:, 


785 


12 


979 


lHSii 


1192 


9 


840 


3105 


970 


8 


749 


3218 


925 


6 


591 


2109 


685 


7 


5'21 


2137 


(,02 


8 


766 


3114 


y,:> 


9 


637 


2162 


693 


8 


793 


2! H)7 


810 


9 


600 


2719 


756 


10 


939 


1711 


1020 


6 


384 


1700 


468 


7 


398 


loss 


465 


Pi 


1(11,0 


421^9 


1157 


7 


483 


1941 


531 


9 


751 


3275 


885 


8 


500 2291 


617 


8 


538 2209 


596 


8 


785 3170 


850 


7 


»i9s 2ts i 


711 


8 


921 


3S93 


1041 



.362 
.868 
.345 
.828 
.325 
.318 
.314 
.314 
.311 
.304 
.300 
.298 
.295 
.295 
.291 
.284 
.V84 
.284 
.281 
.281 
.281 
.278 
.277 
.275 
.275 
.275 
.274 
.273 
.270 
.269 
.269 
.268 
.267 
.267 



74 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

averages — Continued. 



M 

a 

pa 


NAME. 


T3 

m 

s 

00 

° o 

-_ at 
m & 

a co 


Of 

P-. 

°£ 

B 


PQ 

% 

m 

g 


CO 

3 

0Q 

« 

G 



to 

a 



u 

27 
28 


Wm. M. Crowley 

W.B.Phillips... 

) P. J. Hotahng... 

\ W. A. Purcell 


6 

6 

6 

7 

8 

6 
12 

9 

7 

7 

9 

8 

6 
10 

6 

6 

6 

7 

6 

6 

8 

9 
10 

6 

7 J 


453 

529 
514 
50(i 
672 
485 
850 
7*9 
416 
50fi 
686 
444 
447 
499 
336 
372 
282 
565 
442 
308 
474 
510 
746 
286 
338 


1796 
2203 

218.-, 

2136 
281*2 

2014 
35 5 
3048 

171S 
2013 
2C8-J 
104S 
1737 
1957 
1319 
1459 
1043 
218,! 
1671 
12-27 
1825 
1848 
2873 
1C66 
1273 


474 

f 81 

572 
559 
698 
519 
895 
776 
433 
fOU 
655 
401 
413 
464 
311 
333 
238 
489 
369 
265 
392 
387 
598 
221 
222 


.264 
.263 
.261 
261 


89 


A. A. Irwin 


259 


:io 


J, E. Manning 


957 


31 


John J. Burdock 


255 


32 


Jno. Farrell 


.254 


:v, 


J. P. Casaidy 


2ft?- 


M 


Chas. Radbonrn. 


?4R 


35 


F. S. Flint 


244 


36 
37 


M.Welch 

I Jacob Evans. 


.243 

237 


[ Jas. McCormick 


?37 


:>,s 


Geo. W. Bradley 


085 


39 


(Job. L. Q,neet 


228 


(Chas. F. Briody 


228 


40 
41 


J. J. Gerhardt 

Frank Hanklnson 


.224 

220 


4-' 


L.Corcoran . 


Mft 


■t.' ! . 


Jas. F. Galvin 


215 


44 


B. Gilligan 


209 


4n 


D. W. Force 


208 


■u; 


w. 11. Holbert 


?07 


4? 


Geo. E. Weldman 


.174 



. 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES, 1SS7. 



75 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES PLAYED 
SEASON OF 1887. 



Date 

1887. 



May 



April 28 
" 28 
" 29 
«* 29 
" 29 
" 30 
" 30 
30 
31 i 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
8 
•l 
4 
4 

5 

5 
5 
f. 
6 

? 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



New York vs. Philadelphia. 
Indianapolis vs. Detroit. ... 



Washington vs. Boston 

New York vs. Philadelphia, 
Philadelphia vs. New York. . 

Indianapolis vs. Detroit 

Pittsburg vs. Chicago 

Washington vs. Boston 

** New York.. 

Pittsburg vs. Detroit 

Philadelphia vs. Boston 

Indianapolis vs. Chicago.... 



Winning Clfb 



New York. 
Detroit. 



Philadelphia vs. Boston 

Pittsburg vs. Detroit 

Washington vs. New York. 



Pittsburg* vs. Detroit 

Indianapolis vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. Boston 

New York '• . 

Washington vs. Philadelphia. 
Detroit vs. Indianapolis 



Chicago vs . Pittsburg 

Washington vs. Philadelphia. 
New York vs. Boston 



Washington vs. Philadelphia. 

Chicago vs . Pittsburg 

Detroit vs. Indianapolis. 

" Pittsburg 

New York vs. Washington.,,. 
Chicago vs. Indianapolis... . 
Boston vs. Philadelphia. 



Detroit vs. Pittsburg 

Chicago vs. Indianapolis.., 
New York vs. Washington . 



Chicago vs. Indianapolis . . . 

Detroit vs. Pittsburg 

Boston vs. Philadelphia 

Philadelphia vs. New York. 

Boston vs. Washington 

Pittsburg vs. Indianapolis.. 



Boston 

New Y<rk... 
Philadelphia. 

Detroit.. 

Pittsburg. ... 

Boston 

New York... 
Pittsburg. ... 

Boston 

Indianapolis. 

Chicago 

Boston ... 

Detroit, 

Washington.. 
New York... 

Detroit 

Inciianapoiis. 
Philadelphia. 

Tie ...... 

Tie 

Detroit 



Pittsburg 

Philadelphia. 
Now York... 

Boston 

Philadelphia. 

Pittsburg 

Detroit . . 



Washington.. 

Chicago 

Philadelphia. 

Boston 

Detroit.. 

Chicago 

Washington.. 
New York... 

Chicago. 

Detroit 

Philadelphia. 
New York... 

Boston 

PitiBburp. ... 



Runs 
Scored. 



8 
4 
4 
9 
12 
2 
4 
4 
3 
6 
1 
4 
3 
5 
4 
8 
8 
5 

6 
5 
3 
3 
3 

1 
4 
1 
8 
2 
3 
4 
3 
2 
4 
4 
3 
3 
8 
6 
2 

4 

7 




76 RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES, 1887. 

record of championship games — Continued. 



Date 

18S7. 



May 12 
13 
l:i 
18 
13 
14 
14 
14 
11 
16 
16 
16 
16 
17 
17 
17 
17 
is 
18 
18 
18 

1!) 

19 

19 
1!) 
SO 
21 r 
20 
20 
21 
21 
21 
21 
23 
28 
SW 
e:j 

24 
24 
24 
*5 
20 
86 
86 
27 
27 
27 
'Si 
28 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



Chicago vs, Detroit 

Pittsburg ve, Indianapolis 

Boston vs. Washington 

Philadelphia vs. New York .. 
New York ve. Philadelphia. .. 
Pittsburg vs. Indianapolis. .. . 

Boston vs. Washington 

Chicago vs. Detroit 

Washington vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. Detroit 

New York vs. Indianapolis... 
Boston vs. Pittsburg 

(4 C4 

New York vs . Indianapolis . . 

Philadelphia vs. Detroit 

Washington vs . Chicago 

New York vs. Indianapolis.. 

Boston vs. PittBburg 

Philadelphia vs. Detroit 

ti (« 

Boston vs. Pittsburg 

New York vs. Indianapolis... 

Washington vs. Chicago 

«< Detroit,.. . 

Philadelphia vs. Chicago 

New York vs. Pittsburg 

Boston vs. Indianapolis 

New York vs. Pittsburg 

Philadelphia vs. Chicago.. .. 
Washington vs. Detroit 

Philadelphia vs. Chicago 

New York vs. Pittsburg 

Boston vs. Indianapolis ... .. 

New York vs. Pittsburg 

Philadelphia vs. Chicago 

Boston " 

New York vs. Detroit 

Philadelphia vs. Indianapolis 

New York vs. Detroit 

Boston ve. Chicago 

Washington vs. Pittsburg. .. 
New York vs. Det-oit. 



Winning Club 



Chicago 

Detroit 

Indianapolis 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburg. . 

Boston 

Detroit .. 

Washington. 

Detroit 

New York.. 

Boston 

ci 

New York., 

Detroit 

Washington. 

Indianapolis. 

Boston 

Detroit. 

11 

Pittsbnrg. ... 
New York... 

Chicago. 

Detroit , 

Chicago , 

New York .. 

Boston 

11 

New York.., 
Philadelphia 

Detroit 

Washington. 

Chicago 

New York ., 
Indianapolis, 

Boston 

Pittsburg. .., 
Philadelphia, 

Boston 

Chicago , 

New York... 
Philadelphia. 

Detroit 

Boston 

Pittsburg. .., 
New York... 



Runs 
Scored. 



il 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP C.AMKS, 1S87. 



77 



record of championship ( ;ames — Continued. 



Date 

1887. 



May 28 
30 
30 
30 

:jo 
3i> 
30 

3D 

31 
SI 

31 
1 



June 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



Philadelphia vs. Indian apoliB. 
Washington " 



New Ywrk vs. Chicago 

Boston vs. Detroit 

II M ......... 

Pittsburg vs. Philadelphia. 



Winning Club 






Philadelphia. 
Washington . 
Indianapolis. 
Chicago 



New York vs. Chicago 

Boston vs. Detroit 

New York vs. BoBton 

Philadelphia " 
Washington vs. New York. 
Indianapolis vs. Pittsburg. 
Washington vs. New York. 

Detroit vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. Boston 

Indianapolis vs. Pittsburg.. 



Philadelphia vs. Boston. . , . 

Detroit vs. Chicago 

Washington vs. New York. . 

11 Boston 

Philadelphia vs. New York. 



Detroit vs. Pittsburg 

Indianapolis vs. Cnicago.. . 

Washington vs. Boston 

Indianapolis vs. Chicago..., 
Philadelphia vs. New York. 
New York vs. Washington 

Chicugo vs. Pittsburg 

Boston vs. Philadelphia — 
Detroit vs. Indianapolis 



New York vs. Washington. 
Boston vs. Philadelphia. . . . 
Chicago vs. Pittsburg 



Detroit 

BoBton 

Philadelphia.. 
Pittsburg. . , 
Philadelphia. 
New York... 

Boston 

New York... 

Boston 

Washington.. 

Pittsburg 

New Y©rk..„, 

Chicago 

Philadelphia. 
Indianapolis. 
Pittsburg. ... 
Boston... ... 

Chicago. 

Washington.. 
Tie 



Philadelphia. 
Detroit 
Indianapolis. 
Washington.. 

Chicago 

New York.,. 
Washington . 
Pittsburg. ... 

Boston 

Detroit 



Boston vs. Philadelphia 

New York vs. Washington.. 

Detroit vs. Indianapolis 

Pittsburg vs. Detroit... 

Boston ve. Washington 

New York vs. Philadelphia. 
Chicago vs. Indianapolis.... 



New York... 

Boston 

Chicago 



Boston 

New York... 

Detroit. 

Pittsburg. ... 

Boston.. 

Philadelphia. 
Chicago 



Runs 
Scored. 






«o 



.8 
1 
5 

11 
2 
1 
3 
1 
4 
5 
8 
1 
3 

3 
3 
2 
% 
1 

4 
1 
1 
1 
7 
6 

14 
1 
3 
2 
3 
4 
2 
5 
3 
5 
2 
2 
4 
3 
4 
9 
2 
6 
3 
4 
4 
4 
1 



78 RECORD OT CHAMPIONS I III" C.AMES, 1 887. 

record OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES— Continued. 



Date 
1887. 



•IllIlM 1 I 

14 
II 
15 
15 
15 
15 
16 
16 
16 
16 
17 
17 
1« 
17 
17 
IB 
is 
is 
18 

21 
21 
81 
82 
22 
22 
S3 
88 
88 
88 
88 
84 
21 
24 
25 
85 
25 
85 
87 



27 



80 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



Boston, vs. Washington 

New York vs. Philadelphia. 
Pittsburg vs. Detroit 



Boston vs. Washington , 

New York vs. Philadelphia. ., 

Chicago vs. I ndianapolis 

" Detroit 

Philadelphia vs. Washington. 

Boston vs. New York 

Indianapolis v.-.- Pittsburg. . . . , 



Boston vs. New York. 



Winking Club 



Philadelphia vs. Washington. 
Chicago vs Detroit 



Indianapolis vs. Pittsburg.... 
Philadelphia vs. Washington.. 

Boston vs. New York 

Chicago vs, Philadelphia 

Indianapolis vs. Boston 

Detroit vs. Washington 



Indianapolis vs. Boston.. 
Chicago vs. Philadelphia. 
Pittsburg vs. New York. ., 



Chicago vs. Philadelphia 

Indianapolis vs. Boston 

Detroit vs. Washington 

Pittsburg vs. New York , 

Chicago vs. B iston 

Indianapolis ve. Philadelphia. 
Pittsburg vs. Washington..... 

Chicago vs. Boston 

Detroit vs. New York 

Indianapolis vs. Philadelphia. 

Pittsburg vs. Washington 

Indianapolis vs. Philadelphia. 

Chicago vs . B iston 

Detroit vs. New York 



Pittsburg vs. Washington 

Indianapolis vs. Philadelphia. 

Chicago vs. Boston 

Pittsburg vs. Washington 

Detroit vs. Philadelphia. 



Boston , 

New York.. 
Detroit 

Washington. 
New York.. 
Chicago 

Philadelphia 

Boston 

Indianapolis 
Pittsburg. .. 

Boston 

New York. . 
Washington. 

Detroit 

Chicago . 

Indianapolis 
Philadelphia 
New York.., 

Chicago 

Indianapolis 
Detroit 

Boston 

Chicago 

New York.. 
Pittsburg. .. 

Tie 

Indianapolis 

Detroit 

New York.. 

Chicago 

Indianapolis 
Washington 

Chicago , 

New York.., 
Philadelphia. 
Pittsburg. ... 
Philadelphia 

Boston 

New York ., 
Detroit ... 
Pittsburg. .., 
Philadelphia 

Chicago 

Washington 

Detroit , 

Philadelphia 



Runs 
Scored. 



%5 

'SO 



8 
5 
8 
11 
13 
89 
3 
8 
is 
12 
4 
9 
IS 
6 
13 
II 
18 
18 
7 
5 
9 
4 
16 
12 
17 
11 
3 
2 
7 
10 
4 
5 

15 
6 
5 
8 

15. 
11 
9 
18 
17 
11 
7 
8 
24 

7 
8 
10 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES, 1887. 79 

RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES — Continued. 



Date 

1887. 



July 



»■ 30 

30 
1 
1 

1 

1 
2 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



Chicago vs. Washington... 

Pittsburg vs. Boston 

Indianapolis vs. New York. 



Pittsburg vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. Washington. 
Detroit vs. Philadelphia. . 



Chicago vs. Washington 

Pittsburg vs. Boston 

Indianapolis vs. New York. . , 

V Washington. 

Philadelphia vs. Pittsburg... 



Chicago vs. New York. 
Detroit vs. Boston 



Indianapolis vs. Washington. 

Chicago vs. New York 

Philadelphia vs. Pittsburg. .. 

u Chicago 

New York vs. Detroit 

Washington vs. Indianapolis. 
Bjston vs. Pittsburg 



Philadelphia vs. Chicago 

Washington vs. Indianapolis. 
Nbw York vs. Detroit 



Boston vs. Pittsburg 

Washington vs. Indianapolis . . . 

Philadelphia vs. Chicago 

" Indianapolis. 

Washington vs. Chicago 

New York vs. Pittsburg 



Washington vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. Indianapolis. 
Boston vs. Detroit 



Philadelphia vs. Indianapolis. 
Washington vs. Chicago 

New York vs Pittsburg 

Boston vs. Detroit 

Washington vs. Pittsburg 



Boston vs. Indianaoolls., 
Philadelphia vs. Detroit. 



Winning Club 



Washington. 
Pittsburg ... 
New York... 



Boston.., 
Chicago . 
Detroit.. 



Chicago 

Boston 

New York... 
Washington . . 
Philadelphia. 
Pittsburg. ... 
Chicago 



Detroit. 



Runs 

Scored. 



Indianapolis . 

Chicago . 

Philadelphia. 

Chicago 

New York... 
Indianapolis . 

Boston 

Pittsburg. ... 

Chicago 

Indianapolis. 
Detroit 



Boston 

Indianapolis. 

Chicago 

Philadelphia. 
Washington , 
Pittsburg. ... 



Chicago 

Philadelphia. 
Boston.... ... 



Philadelphia. 
Washington . 
New York... 

Detroit 

Washington . 

Indianapolis. 
Philadelphia. 



■go 

i 



8 
10 
5 
4 
3 
IS 
3 
% 
1 

2 
6 
4 
1 
2 
3 
8 
4 
3 
2 
3 
8 
j> 

6 
2 
8 

1 
G 
5 
4 
3 
3 
6 
4 
2 
6 
6 
5 
3 
4 
5 

3 
4 
3 
9 
3 

a 



r /y 



■ i 



80 RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES, 1 887, 

record of championship games— 'Continued. 



Date 
1887. 



J II 



ly 15 
1G 
16 
16 

ie 

is 
18 
18 
19 
19 
19 
19 
30 

28 
20 
31 

m 

22 

82 

23 
28 
28 
28 
26 
25 
26 
20 
96 
26 
26 
27 
27 
28 
28 
28 
28 
29 
29 
29 
2'J 
30 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



New York vb. Chicago. 



Philadelphia vs. Detroit.... 

Boston vs. Indianapolis 

Washington vs. Pittsburg . . . 

New York vs. Chicago 

Washington vs. Pittsburg. . . 

Philadelphia vs. Detroit.... 

11 Pittsburg, , 

Washington v». Detroit 

Boston vs. Chicago . . 

New York vs. Indianapolis. 



Winn in a Club 



Chicago. 



Philadelphia. 

Boston. 

Washington . 
New York... 
Pittsburg. ... 
Philadelphia- 

Tie 1 

Boston 

New York... 



Philadelphia vs. Pittsburg 

Washington vs. Detroit. , 

Boston vs. Chicago ., 

New York vs. Ind anapolis..., 
Philadelphia vs. Pittsburg..., 
Washington vs. Philadelphia. 

Pittsburg vs. Indianapolis 

Detroit vs. Chicago 



Washington vs. Philadelphia. 

Pittsburg vs. Indianapolis 

New York vs. Boston 



Boston vs. Chicago ; Chicago — ., 

Washington vs. Detroit Washington . 

Philadelphia. 

Washington.. 

Boston 

New York... 

Pittsburg. ... 

Washington. . 

Indianapolis. 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Washington.. 

Pittsburg. ... 

New York... 
fi 

Pittsburg. '.'.". 
Philadelphia. 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Indianapolis. 
Philadelphia. 
Indianapolis. 
New York... 
Chicago 



Pittsburg vs. Indianapolis 

Washingion vs. Philadelphia 
Detroit vs. Chicago..... 



Pittsburg vs. Indianapolis . . . 

a Philadelphia... 

Indianapolis vs. Washington. 

Detroit vs. New York 

Chi cago vs. Boston — 



Detroit vs. New York 

Indianapolis vs. Washington. 
Pittsburg ve. Philadelphia.. . 



Indianapolis vs. Washington 

Detroit vs . New York 

Chicago vb. Boston 

Pittsburg vb. New York 

Chicago vs. Washington 

Indianapolis vs. Boston 

Detroit vs. PhiladelDhia . . . 



Detroit 

Washington. . 
Philadelphia. 
Pittsburg. ... 
Indianapolis. 

Detroit 

Boston 

Pittsburg. ... 

Chicago 

Boston 

Philadelphia. 



Runs 
Scorbd. 



SO 



fli 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES, 1SS7. 81 

record of championship games — Continued, 



Date 

1887. 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



Winning Club 



itUNS 
ScOIilD. 



■a© 






Aug. 



Detroit vs. Philadelphi a , 

Indianapolis vs. Boston 

Chicago vs . Washington. 

Pittsburg vs . New 1 ork , 

Chicago vs. Washington 

Detroit vs. Philadelphia , 

Indianapolis vs. Boston , 

Detroit u 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia: 

Detroit vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. New York.. , 

Pittsbnrg vs. Washington 

Chicago vs. New York.... 

Detroit vs. Boston 

Indianapolis vs. Philadelphia 

Detroit vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. New York 

Pittsburg vs. Washington 

" Boston.. 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia , 

Detroit vs. Washington , 

l^.i«r»apoli6 vs. New York.. . 

CI it 

Detroit vs, Washington 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia , 

Pittsburg vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia 

Detroit vs. Washington 

Indianapolis vs. New York 

" Pittsburg 

It IC 

Philadelphia vs. Washington.. 

Boston vs. New York 

Chicago vs. Detroit 

Boston vs. New York 

Philadelphia vs. Washington. , 

Chicago vs. Detroit 

Indianapolis vs. Pittsburg 

Boston vs. New York 

Chicago vs. Detroit , 

Philadelphia vs. Washington. 
Boston " 

Philadelphia vs. New York. . 

Pittsburg vs. Chicago 



Detroit 

Boston 

Chicago 

New York... 



Chicago 

Detroit 

Indianapolis. 

I Detroit 

1 Philadelphia. 

Detroit 

Chicago 

Washington. . 



New York. 
Boston 

Philadelphia. 

Boston 

Chicago 

Washington.. 
Pittsburg. ... 
Philadelphia. 

Detroit 

New York... 
Indianapoiie. 
Washington.. 

Chicago 

Pittsburg. ... 

Philadelphia! 

Detroit 

New York... 
Indianapolis., 
Pittsburg. ... 
Philadelphia. 

Boston 

Chicago 

New York... 
Philadelphia. 

Chicago 

Pittsburer. .. 
New York... 

Detroit 

Philadelphia. 

Boston 

Philadelphia. 

Pittsburg. ... 



82 RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES, 1SS7. 

RECORD OF championship games — Continued. 



Date 


1887. 


Lag 


IS 


CI 


]!' 


II 


l« 


it 


19 


II 


19 


(1 


80 


<t 




t« 


20 


II 


20 


ft 


2D 




.) , 






» 


23 


(( 


2:J 


II 


23 


It 


23 


II 


24 


14 


24 


H 


21 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



Winning Club 



Runs 
Scobbd. 



Indianapolis vs. Detroit \ Detroit . . 



Sept 



25 



Philadelphia vs. New York. 
Pittsburg vs. Chicago.. . 
Indianapolis vs. Detroit, 
Boston vs. Washington. . 



Philadelphia ve. New York. .. 

Pittsburg vs. Chicago 

lodianapolie vs . Detroit 

Philadelphia vs. Indianapolis. 

Washington vb. Detroit 

Philadelphia vs. Indianapolis. 

New York vs. Pittsburg 

Washington vs. Detroit 



New York vs. Pittsburg 

Philadelphia vs. Indianapolis. 

Detroit 

New York vb. Chicago 

Boston ve. Pittshurg 

Washington vs. Indianapolis.. 



New York vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. Detroit 

N a w York vs. Chicago 

Washington vs. Indianapolis. 



Boston vs. Pittsburg 

'* Detroit.'. 

Washington vs. Chicago... 

New York vs. Indianapolis. 
Philadelphia vs. PittBburg. 



New York vs. Indianapolis.. 

Boston vs. Detroit 

Washington vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. Pittsburg... 

Boston vs. Detroit 

u Indianapolis 

New York vs. Detroit 

Philadelphia vs. Chicago 

Washington vs. Pittsburg.... 

New York vs. Detroit 

Washington vs. Pittsburg 

Boston vs. Indianapolis 



Washington vs. Pittsburg 
New York vs. Detroit 



New York 

Pittsburg 

Indianapolis.. 

Boston 

Washington... 



Tie 

Chicago 

Indianapolis 
Philadelphia..! 

Detroit ,. 

Philadelphia.. 

New York 

Detroit 



Pittsburg. ... | 
Philadelphia.. 

New York.... 

Boston 

Washington... 
Indianapolis.. 

Chicago 

Detroit 

New York 

Indianapolis.. 
Washington... 

Boston 

Detroit 

Chicago 

New York 

Pittsburg. .... 
Philadelphia.. 
New York ... 

Detroit.. 

Washington. . . 

Pittsburg 

Detroit 

BoBton. 

Detroit 

Chicago... ... 

Pittsburg 

New York 

Pittsburg. .... 
BoBton 



Washington., 
Detroit 



10 
6 
4 
8 
3 
1 
5 I 

8 

5 

4 
11 
10 

n 

4 

20 I 

i\ 

*\ 
9 

6 



RECORD 05 CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES, 18S7. 80 

record of championship games— Continued. 



Date 
1887. 



Sept. 3 

«' 5 

■• 5 

«» 5 

«« 5 

** 6 

11 6 

M 6 

11 ? 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



Philadelphia vs. Chicago.... 

Boston vs. Philadelphia 

New York vs. Washington . . . 

Detroit vs. Chicago 

Pittsburg vs. Indianapolis. ... 

Boston vs. Philadelphia 

New York vs. Washington . . . 
<< n 

Detroit vs. Chicago... 

11 i< ° 

Boston vs. Philadelphia 

11 New York 

Washington vs. Philadelphia 

Detroit vs. Pittsburg 

Chicago vs. Indianapolis 

Washington vs. Philadelphia. 

Chicago vs. Indianapolis * 

Detroit vs. Pittsburg '. 

41 (1 

Boston vs. New York 

Detroit vs. Boston 

Pittsburg vs. Washington 

Indianapolis vs. New York. . . 
Chicago vs. Philadelphia 

Detroit vs. Boston... „ 

Pittsburg vs. Washington 
Indianapolis vs. New York.. 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia. 

Detroit vs. Boston 

Pittsburg vs. Washington. .... 
Indianapolis vs. New York 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburg vs. Boston 

Detroit vs. Washington 

Chicago vs. New York 

u it 

Detroit vs. Washington,....*."! 

PittBburgvs, Boston 

Indianapolis vs. Philadelphia. 

Pittsburg vs. Boston 

Detroit vs. Washington 

Chicago vs. New York , 

11 Washington 

Detroit vs. Philadelphia 



Winning Club 



Philadelphia 

Boston 

New York.., 
Chicago... . 
Pittsburg.. ., 

Philadelphia 
New York.., 
Washington. 
Detroit 

Philadelphia- 
Boston 

Philadelphia 

Detroit , 

Indianapolis 
Philadelphia 

Chicago , 

«t 

Detroit 

Boston 

Detroit 

Pittsburg. .., 
New York.., 
Chicago 

Boston 

Pittsburg. .., 
Indianapolis 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Pittsburg. .., 
New York .. 
Philadelphia, 
Pittsburg. .., 

Detroit 

New York.., 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Boston 

Philadelphia, 

Boston 

Detroit 

Tie 

Cnicago 

Philadelphia. 



Runs 

Scon jsd. 



a 3 ug 



14 ; 3 
13 ; 11 



■1 11 
10 



7 


3 


16 


13 


2 





9 


1 


7 


4 


17 


12 


15 


H 


9 


2 


5 


S 


8 


4 


8 


4 


11 


1 


4 


8 


12 


8 


11 


1 


8 


8 


8 


2 


17 


6 


6 


1 


12 


3 


5 


6 


9 





10 


1 



84 RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES, 18S7. 

record of championship games — Continued, 



Date 
1837. 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



Sept. 



Oct. 



1:. 
19 
20 
20 
20 
20 
21 
21 
21 
22 
22 
22 
22 
23 
23 
28 
23 
23 
24 
24 
24 
24 
28 
23 
26 
27 
27 
27 
28 
2* 
^ 
29 
29 
29 
3'J 
80 
1 
1 
1 
1 
8 

a 
3 

8 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



Indianapolis vs. Boston. . 
Pittsburg vs. New York . 

Detroit vs. Philadelphia. 
Indianapolis vs. Boston.. 
Chicago vs. Washington. 



Indianapolis vs. Boston 

Pittsburg vs. New York 

Indianapolis vs. Washington. 



Chicago vs. Boston 

Detroit vs. New York. 



Chicago vs. Boston. 



Pittsburg vs. Philadelphia,.. 
Indianapolis vs. Washington. 

Detroit vs. New York 

Indianapolis vs. Washington. 
Pittsburg vs. Philadelphia 



Datroitvs. Indianapolis 

Philadelphia vs. Washington. 
New York vs. Boston 



Winning Blub 



Indianapolis. 
New York... 
11 

Philadelphia. 

Boston 

Chicago 



Indianapolis. 
New YorK... 
Washington.. 



Chicago, 
Det oit.. 



Philadelphia vs. Washington. 
Detroit vs. Indianapolis ....... 

Chicago vs. Pittsburg. .... *. '. ". ! 



New York vs. Boston 

Washington vs. New York. 

Pittsburg vs. Detroit 

Washington vs. New York. 

Pittsburg vs. Detroit 

Indianapolis vs. Chicago . . . 
Philadelphia vs. Boston 



Washington vs. New York. 

Pittsburg vs. Detroit 

Indianapolis vs. Chicago . 



Washington vs. New York., 

Pittsburg vs. Detroit , 

Philadelphia vs. Boston 



Chicago...... 

Tie 

Philadelphia. 
Indianapolis. 
New York... 
Washington. . 
Philadelphia. 



Detroit 

Philadelphia. 
New York... 

Boston 

Philadelphia. 
Detroit. 



Runs 

SCOKKI). 



Pittsburg. ... 
Chicago 



Pittsburg. ... 
New York... 
Washington.. 

Detroit 

Tie 

Pittsburg. ... 

Chicago 

Philadelphia. 

a 

New York... 

Detroit 

Chicago 

Indianapolis.. 

Chicago 

New York... 
Pittsburg. ... 
Philadelphia. 



Si 
a© 

a 
5_ 

10 

8 

7 

3 

7 

5 
32 

1 

5 

4 

7 

2 

9 
11 

9 

4 

5 

5 

7 

7 
12 

8 

7 

8 

8 
lit 
13 

S 

7 

6 

4 

4 

5 

6 

1 

2 

3 

io 

5 

n 

8 
7 
10 


2 
6 
6 
7 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES, 1887. 85 

record OF ch^mpionsaip games — Continued. 



Date 

1887. 



Oct. 5 

5 
5 
5 
6 
6 
6 
B 
fi 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



Pittsburg vs. Chicago....... 

Washington vs. Boston 

New York vs. Philadelphia 

Indianapolis vs. Detroit 

Pittsburg vs. Chicago 

C« (I 

Indianapolis vs. Detroit. . . , 

Washington vs. Boston 

New York vs. Philadelphia 
Philadelphia vs. New York 

Washington vs Boston 

Pittsburg va . Chicago 

Indians polis vs. Detroit. . . , 

Washington vs. Boston 

Pittsburg vb, Chicago 

New York vs. Philadelphia 



Winning Club 



Pittsburg. .. 
Washington. 
Philadelphia 
Indianapolis 
Pittsburg. 



Detroit . . 
Boston.,, 
Philadelphia 

Tie 

Washington 
Pittsburg. . 

Tie 

Indianapolis 
Washington, 

Tie 

Philadelphia 



Runs 

Scored. 



aO 



80 
RECORD 



RFXORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. l8S6. 



OF 



CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES PLAYED 
SEASON OF 1886. 

(Bv an oversight the record of championship games for 1886 were not 
published in the League Book for 1587, therefore they are published in 
the 1888 Book.) 



Date 


1886. 


April 29 


*' 


Iftj 


(i 


■J! 


M 


80 


<< 


so 


tt 


30 


ft 


30 




1 


II 


1 


M 


1 


tt 


8 


»t 


3 


II 


3 


tl 


3 


l« 


4 


II 


4 


It 


4 


11 


5 


<< 


5 


u 


5 


ti 


5 


11 


fi 


(l 


6 


it 


6 



- NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



New York vs. Boston 

Washington vs. Philadelphia. 
St. Louis vs. Detroit 



Kansas CitF vs. Chicago 

New York vs. Boston 

Washington vs. Philadelphia. 



New York vs. Boston ....... 

Kansas City vs. Chicago. . , 

St. L mis vs. Detroit 

" Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. New York. 

Kansas City vb. Detroit 

Washington vs. Boston...., 



Philadelphia vs. New York. 
St. Louis vs . Chicago 



Winning Club 



Kansas City vs. Detroit . . . 

Washington vs. Boston 

Philadelphia vs. New York 
" Boston. .. . 
New York vs. Washington.. 
Chicago vs. Detroit 



New York vs. Washington. 
St. Louis vs. Kansas City. . 



New York... 
Washington. . 

Detroit 

St. Louie 

Chicago 

New York... 
Philadelphia. 
Washington.. 
New York... 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Chicago 

Philadelphia. 

Detroit . 

Washington.. 

Boston 

Philadelphia. 

St. Louis 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Boston 

New York... 
Philadelphia. 
New York... 
Chicago 



New York... 

St. Louis 

. Kansas City. 

Chicago vs. Detroit j Detroit 

" Boston Chicago.. 

St. Louis vs. Kansas City St. Louis. 

Detroit \e. New York Detroit 



Chicago vs . Boston 

Detroit vb. New York 

St. Louis vs. Washington. 



Chicago vs. New York, 
Detroit vs. Boston 



St. Louis vs. Philadelphia. 



Boston .. 
Detroit. . . 
St. Louis. 

Chicago.. 
Detroit... 



St. Louis 

Philadelphia. 

Detroit vs. Boston Detroit 

St. Louis vs, Philadelphia Philadelphia. 

Chicago vs. Boston Chicago 

,l Washington '« 



Huns 
Scored. 



L'-s 



5 

6 

9 

8 

6 

10 

12 

9 

7 

17 

'J 

7 

I 

1! 

12 
B 

il 
6 
9 
1 

12 
4 

13 
7 
5 
8 
6 
7 
2 
£ 
7 
5 
9 

10 
5 
y 
8 

16 
7 
4 
5 
i 

(3 
9 
4 

7 



k 



V 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES, lSS6. 87 

record of championship games — Continued. 



Pate 

1886. 



Alav 18 

" 18 

" 18 

» 19 

'« 19 

" 11/ 

» 1!) 

" 20 

11 20 

" 20 

k< 20 

" 21 

• " 21 

M 21 

" 21 



" 381 

M 2H ! 

41 28 

" 28 

" 29 

t; 20 

< J 2M 

» 29 

" 20 

41 31 

M 31 

" 31 

" 31 

11 31 

June I 

*« 1 

" 1 

u 3 



NAMES OP CONTESTANTS. 



Detroit vs. Philadelphia..., 

St. Louis vs. Boston 

Kansas City vs. New York. 



Winning Club 



SO 

.a 



Detroit 

St. Louie... 
New York. 



Detroit vs. Philadelphia ..' Detroit... 

Chicago vs. Washington Chicago.. 

St. Louis vs. Boston Boston , . . 

St. Louis. 



Kansas City vs. New York. 

Chicago vs Washington 

Detroit vs. Philadelphia 

M Washington. ,. . 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia... 

St. Louis vs. New York 

Kansas City vs. Boston . 



Chicago vs. Philadelphia. 
Detroit vs. Washington. . 
St. Louis vs. New York. . . 



Kansas City vs. Boston 

Detroit vs . Washington . 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia 

Washington ve. Chicago 

New York vs. St. Louis 

Philadelphia vs. Kansas City. 

New York vs. St. Louis 

Boston vs. Detroit 

Washington vs. Chicago , 



Philadelphia vs. Kansas City. 



Kansas City., 

Chicago 

Detroit 



Chicago 

New York 

Boston.. 

Kansas City.. 

Chicago 

Detroit 

New York 

Kansas City.. 

Detroit 

Chicago 

Washington... 
New York . 
Philadelphia.. 
Kansas City. 

New York 

Detroit 

Chicago 



Runs 
Scored. 



Boston vs. Detroit 

New York vs. St. Louis. 
Boston " 



New York vs. Detroit .... 

a u 

Philadelphia vs. Chicago. 



Washington vs. Kansas City. 

Boston vs. St. Louis 

New York vs. Detroit 

" Kansas Citv. 

Philadelphia vs. St. Louis.*.. 

Washington vs. Detroit 

Boston vs. Chicago 



Philadelphia.. 

Detroit ... ,*J 
New York.... I 

St. Louis 

Boston.... 

New York 

Detroit 

Chicago 

Philadelphia.. 
Kansas City.. 

Boston. 

New York 

u 

Philadelphia!! 

Detroit 

Chicago 



8 

5 
in 

2 

6 

9 

7 

8 



*» 
13 

6 
11 

5 

7 ' 
5 
8 
15 
4 

20 

! 
1 

9 
9 

4 
10 
6 
4 
4 
3 
o 

4 
R 
7 
8 
6 
If 
6 



RFXORD GF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES, lS86. 
record of championship games — Continued. 



Date 

1886, 



Juno 3 
8 

3 

•1 
4 
4 
4 
5 
5 
5 
5 



8 

e 

8 
9 
10 

10 

11 

n 
n 
n 
12 

12 
12! 

12 
14 
11 
11 
15 
IS' 

15 

16 
16 
16 
17 
17 
17 
is 
18 
19 
19 
19 
19 
21 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



Philadelphia vs. St. Louis. . 
New York vs. Kansas City. 
Washington vs. Detroit 



New York vs. Kansas City. 

Boston vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. St. Louis. 
" Detroit... 
New York vs. Chicago .... 
Washington vs. St. Louis. . 
Boston vs. Kaneas City 



Washington vs. St. Louis. 
Philar elphia vs. Detroit. . . 
New York vs. Chicago .... 



Philadelphia vs. Detroit 

Washington vs. St. Louis, 

Boston vs. Kaneas City 

New York vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. Washington. 
Boston vs. New York 



Philadelphia vs. Washington . 

Detroit vs. t^t. Louis 

Chicago vs. Kansas City 



Philadelphia vs. Washington. 

Boston vs. New York 

Detroit vs. St. Louis 



Boston vs. Washington 

Chicago vs. Kansas City 

New York vs. Philadelphia. 

Detroit vs. Kansas City 

Boston vs. Washington 



New York vs. Philadelphia 



Winning Club 



Philadelphia. 
New York.,. 

Detroit 

Tie 

New York... 

Chicago 

Philadelphia. 

Detroit 

Chicago 

Washington., 

Boston 

Kansas City. 
Washington.. 
Philadelphia. 

Tie 

Chicago 

Detroit 

St Louis.,., . 

Boston 

New York... 
Philadelphia. 
Bos* on 



Philadelphia. 

Detroit 

Karsas City. 

Chicago 

Philadelphia. 
New York... 
Detroit 



Washington,. 

Chicago 

New York... 

Detroit 

Boston 



Philadelphia. 



Detroit vs. Kansas City 1 Detroit. 

u 1. 

Chicago vs. St. Louis 

Boston vs. Philadelphia 

New York vs. Washington 



Chicago 

Philadelphia. 

New York.., 



Boston vs. Philadelphia Philadelphia. 

Detroit vs. Chicago fhicago 

Kansas City vs. St. Louis 1 St Louis 



Runs 
Scored. 






: 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES, lSS6. 



89 



record OF championship games — Continued. 



Dath 

1886. 



June 21 
21 
22 
22 
28 
23 
23 
23 
24 
24 
-1 
25 
..'5 
26 
26 
28 
28 
28 

2S 

29 

2!) 

39 

2!J 
30 

:*» 

1 



July 



NAMES OP CONTESTANTS. 



Winning Club 



Detroit vs. Chicago 

New York vs. Washington. . 
Kansas City vs. St. Louis, . . 

Detroit vs. Chicago 

" Philadelphia 

Chicago vs. Washington — 

St. Louis vs. New York 

Kansas City vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. Washington 

St. Louis vs. New York 

Chicago va. Washington 

« Philadelphia.... 

Detroit vs. Washington 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia 

Detroit vb. Washington 

Kansas City vs. New York.. 
St. Louis vs. Boston 

(I (4 

Detroit vs. Washington 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia 

Kansan City vs. New York. . 

St Louis vs. Boston 

Detroit " 

St. Louis vs. Washington . . . 

Chicago vs. New York 

Kansas City vs. Philadelphia 

Chicago vs. New York 

Detroit vs. Boston 

St. Louis vs. Washington. . . 

Kansas City vs. Philadelphia 

Dei roit vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. New York 

" Boston.. 

41 41 

Detroit vs. New York 

if M 

St. Louis vs. Philadelphia. .. 

44 <l 

Kansas City vs. Washington 

Detroit vs. New York 

St. Louis va, Philadelphia 

Kansas City vs. Washington 
Chicago vs. Boston 



Detroit 

New York... 
St. Louis.... 
Detroit 

it 

Chicago , 

New York.. 

Boston 

Kansas City 

Chicago. 

New York.. 

4( 

Chicago 

44 

Detroit..'.!".*.! 

Chicago 

Detroit ., 

New York.. . 
St Louis..., 

Boston , 

Washington. 
Philadelphia 
New York.. 

Boston , 

4( 

St. Louis.... 

Chicago 

Philadelphia 

New York.., 

Detroit 

Washington. 

St. Louis 

Philadelphia 

Detroit 

New York... 
C hicago ..... 

Boston , 

Detroit 

Philadelphia! 

Kansas City 

New York... 

Philadelphia 
Kansas City 
Bopton.... ... 



Runs 
Scored. 



gG 



7 


3 


8 


2 


9 


6 


11 


1 


19 


2 


7 


6 


3 


2 


8 


2 


7 


5 


7 


3 


in 


4 


6 


1 


8 


6 


11 


10 


8 


1 


3 


2 


7 


4 


8 


1 


13 


9 


*■ 


1 


10 


4 


9 


6 



90 RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP (-AMES, lSS6, 

RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP (JAMES — Continued. 



Da 


TE 


1886. 


fulv 


? 


u 


7 


*' 


8 


u 


6 


•4 


9 


(( 


9 


** 


9 


** 


9 


it 


In 


It 


io 


a 


lit 


II 


10 


M 


i° 






(( 


12 


CI 


12 


(1 


12 


u 


18 


11 


l:; 


II 


M 


It 


li 


(t 


it 


(t 


u 


tl 


1- 


It 


18 


(1 


15 


II 


18 


M 


16 


41 


16 


(I 


Hi 


(( 


Hi 


II 


tf 


<< 


17 


If 


17 


" 


17 


11 


19 


11 


19 


II 


10 


II 


1!' 


II 


20 


tl 


•jo 


II 


20 


u 


21 


II 


21 


II 


21 


II 


22 


II 


22 


X 


22 


II 


22 


II 


23 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



Chicago vs. New York... 
Detroit vb. Philadelphia. . 

Chicago vs. Detroit 

Kansas City vs. St. Louie . 



Chicago ve. Detroit 

Philadelphia vs. New York. . 

Washington vb. Boston 

Kansas City vb. St. Louis 

Chicago vs. Detroit 

Philadelphia vs. New York. 
Washington vs. Boston . 



St. Louis vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. New York. 
Kansas City vs. Detroit 



St. Lonis vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. Boston 

Kansas City vs. Detrott 

Washington vs. New York. 

St. Louis vs. Chicago 

Detroit 

Washington vs. New York. 

Philadelphia vs. Boston 

Kansas City vs. Chicago 



Wa'hington vs. Philadelphia. 

New York vs. Boston 

St. Louis vs. Detroit 



Kansas City vb. Chicago 

New York vs. Bomon. 

Washington vs. Philadelphia. 



I Runs 
I Scored. 



w 



Chicago.. 
Detroit... 

Chicago.. 
St. Louis. 



Chicago. ...... 

Ntw York 

Boston 

Knnsas City.. 

Chicago ... 

Philadelph a 
Washington... 

Boston 

Chicago 

Philadelphia 
Detroit 



St. Louis 

Philadelphia.. 

Detroit 

New York... 

St. Louis 

Detroit 

New York... 
Philadelphia.. 
Chicago 



Chicago 

New York — 

Philadelphia.. 

. Washington... 

Chicago vs. St. Louis Chicago 

New York vs. Boston j New York 

Detroit vs. Kansas City Detroit 



Philadplph.a.. 

New York 

Detroit 



New York vs. Philadelphia New York. . . , 

Chicago vs. St. Louis Chicago.. 



Detroit vs. Kansas City Kansas City . 

Boston vs. Washington Boston 



New York vs. Philadelphia New York. . . 

Chicago vs. Kansas City Chicago 

Detroit vs. St. Louis Detroit 



9 

4 
10 

8 
10 
12 j 
I 1 

3 

8 

II 

19 
12 

9 

3 

17 
7 
6 
8 



II 
7 
9 
4 



4 

8 
7 
9 
3 

3 I 
5 

* 4 o 

6 

12 
15 
10 
2 

14 I 

io I 

12 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES, lS86. 91 

RECORD OF championship GAMES — Continued. 



Date 

1886. 



July 



Aug. 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



New York vs. Philadelphia. 

Chicago vs. Kaneae City 

Boston vs. Washington.. 

Detroit vs. St. Louis 

Chicago vs. Kansas City 

Washington vh. New York.., 
Boston vs. Philadelphia 



Washington ve. New York. 



Winning Club 



Philadelphia. 

Chicago 

Boston 

Detroit . 

Chicago 

Washington.. 
Philadelphia. 

Boston 

New York... 



11 Detroit 

New York va. St. Louis 

Philadelphia vs. Kansas City. 
Button vs. Chicago 



New York vs. St. Louis 

Philadelphia vs. Kansas City. 
Washington vs. Detroit 



Philadelphia vs. Kansas City. 

Boston vs. Chicago 

New York vs. St. Louis 

" Chicago. 

Washington vs. Kansas City. 

Philadelphia vs. Detroit 

Boston vs. St. Louis 



Detroit 

New York... 
Philadelphia. 

Boston 

Chicago 

St. Louis 

Philadelphia. 

Detroit 

Washington.. 
Philadelphia. 

Boston 

New York... 

Kansas City. 

Detroit 

Boston 



Puns 

SCOBED. 



New York vs. Chicago ., 

Philadelphia vs. Detroit 

Washington vs. Kansas City. 



Philadelphia vs. Detroit.. . 

New York vs. Chicago 

Boston vs. St. Louis 

" Detroit 

Philadelphia vs. St. Louis. . 
New York vs. Kansas City. 
Washington vs. Chicago 



Boston vs. Detroit 

Philadelphia vs. St. Louis.. 
New York vs. KanBas City. 



Boston vs. Detroit 

Philadelphia vs. St. Louis. 
Washington vs. Chicago. . . 
" St. Louis. 

BoBton vs. Kansas City . 
Washington vs St. Louis. 



New York. .. 
Philadelphia. 
Kansas City. 
it 

Philadelphia. 
New York... 

Tie 

Boston.... ... 

St. Louie 

.New \ork... 
Chicago 



Detroit 

St. Louis 

New York... 
Kansas City. 

Boston 

Philadelphia. 

Chicago 

St. Louis 

Boston 

St. Louis 



I 

6 
1 
3 
1 

o 



:i 
1 

7 
4 
4 
10 



92 RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES, l8S6. 

record OF championship games — Continued, 



Date 


1886. 


fime 


. ft 


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12 


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ii 


13 


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If 


11 


If 


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If 


16 


<< 


16 


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16 


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II 


17 


(I 


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II 


23 


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1. 


24 


H 


Jl 


ti 








tt 


SB 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



Boston vb. Kansas City Kansas City. 

New York vs. Detroit New York 



Philadelphia vs. Chicago. 



Boston vs. Kansas City. . , 
Washington vs. St. Louis. 
New York vs. Detroit 



Philadelphia vs. Washington. 
Boston vs. New York ....... 

Chicago vs. St. Louis 

Detroit vs. Kansas City 



Chicago vs. St. Louis..: 

Boston vs. New York 

Philadelphia vs. Washington. 



Detroit vs. Kansas City 

Chicago vs. St. Louis 

Boston vs. New York...... 

Chicago vs. Kansas City 

Philadelphia vs. Boston.... 

Detroit vs. St. Louis 

Washington vs. New York. 



Detroit vs. St. Louis 

Philadelphia vs. Boston. 
Chicago vs. Kansas City. 



Philadelphia vs. Boston 

Detroit vs. St. Louis 

Washington vs. New York . . 

" Boston 

Chicago vs. St. Louis 

Philadelphia vs. New York. 



Washington vs. Boston 

Detroit vg. Chicago 

St. Louis vs. Kansas City.. 

Philadelphia vs. New York" 

Washington vs. Boston 

Detroit vs. Chicago... 



St. Louis vs. Kansas City . . . 
Detroit vs. Philadelphia.... 

Chicago vs. Boston ... . 

Kansas City vs. New York. 
St, Louis vs. Washington.. 



Winning Club 



Philadelphia. 

Chicago 

Boston 

Washington.. 
New York... 

u 

Philadelphia. 
New York... 

Chicago 

Detroit 



St. Louis 

New York.... 
Philadelphia.. 

Detroit ." 

Chicago 

Boston 

Chicago 

Boston 

St. Louis 

Washington... 

New York 

Detroit 
Philadelphia.. 
Chicago 



Philadelphia.. 

Detroit 

Tie 

Boston 

Chicago 

Philadelphia.. 

New York 

Boston 

Detroit 

St. Louis 



Philadelphia.. 

Boston .. 

Detroit 

Chicago 

at. Louis 

Philadelphia.. 

Chicago 

Kansas City.. 

St. Louis 

Washington. . . ' 



Runs 
Scored. 



tin 

So 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES, lSS6. 93 

record of championship games — Continued, 



Date 
1886. 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



Winking Club 



Runs 

SCORSD. 



Aug. '£> 



B® 



23 

86 
26 

26 1 

27 

27 

27 
27 

23 
2s 
28 
SJ 
80 
:{f) 
:}<> 
:51 
31 
)t. 1 

1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
o 

8 
4 

4 
4 
4 
6 
6 



Detroit vs. Philadelphia... 

Chicago vs. Boston 

Kansas City vs. New York. 



St. Louis vs. Washington 

Detroit vs. Philadelphia 

Chicago vs. Boston 

" Philadelphia 

Detroit vs. Boston , 

St. Louis vs. New York 

Kansas City vs. Washington. 



Detroit 

Chicago...,, 
New York 



St. Louis 

Philadelphia. 
Chicago 



Detroit vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. Philadelphia. 



Detroit vs. Boston 

St. Louis vs. New York 

Kansas City vs. Washington. 



Boston 

New York... 
Kansas City. 



Detroit... 

Chicago.. 



St. Louis vs. New York 

" Boston 

Chicago vs. Washington 

Detroit vs. New York 

Kansas City vs. Philadelpeia. 



Chicago vs. Washington 

Detroit vs. New York 

St. Louis ve. Boston 

Kansas City vs. Philadelphia. 



Detroit vs. New York 

St. Louis vs. Boston....... 

Chicago vs. Washington . . 

" New York 

Detroit vs. Washington..., 
St. Louis vs. Philadelphia. 
Kansas City vs. Boston . . . 



Chicago vs. New York 

Detro;t vs. Washington. .. 
St. Louis vs. Phi'adelphia. 



Boston 

St. Louis. 

Washington,. 
Kansas City. 

St. Louis 

Boston 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Philadelphia. 
Kansas City. 

Chicago .. 

Detroit 

St. Louis 

Philadelphia. 

j Detroit \ 

. S'. Louis 

.] Chicago.. 



Kansas City vs. Boston . . 
Detroit ve. Washington. 
Chicago ve. New York.. 



9 " Detroit 

9 Kansas City vs. St. Louis. 
10 

10 Chicago vs. Detroit 



Detroit 

St, Louis 

Boston 

Kansas City. 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Philadelphia. 

St. Louis 

Boston 

Detroit 

Chicago 



Detroit 

Tie 

Kansas City. 
Chicago 



5 
1 
2 

7 
3 

10 
4 
1 
3 
1 
2 

5 
8 

10 
2 



94 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP (.AMES, lSS6. 



record of championship ©AMES— Continued. 



Date 
1886. 



NAMES OP CONTESTANTS. 



Winning Club 



Runs 
Scored. 



Sept. 10 

11 

11 
11 
11 
13 

ia 

13 
13 
14 

U 
IS 
15 
15 

18 
IS 
10 
16 

16 

17 
17 
17 

17 

V, 
I*, 
181 
18 
18, 
20 
20 
*Q 
2J 

•:\ 
21 
21 



23 
23 
23 
:>l 
24 
23 
29 
35 
s»5 
25 



Washington vs. Philadelphia. 

Chicago ve. Detroit 

Kansas City vs. St. Louis, 



Washington vs. Philadelphia. 
New York vs. Boston 



St. Louis vs. Chicago 

Washington vs. Philadelphia. 
Kansas City vs. Detroit . 



St. Louis vs. Chicago ....... 

New York vs. Boston 

" Washington. 
Kansas City vs. Detroit 



Boston vs. Philadelphia... 

St. Louis vs. Chicago 

** Detroit 

New York vs. Washington. 
Kansas City vs. Chicago. . . 



New York vs. Washington . 

f<t. Louis vs. Detroit 

Boston ys. Philadelphia 

'* Washington 

Kansas City vs. Chicago. .. 

St. Louis vs. Detroit 

New York vs. Philadelphia. 

Detroit vs. Chicago " 

Boston vs. Washington 

St. Louis vs. Kansas City. . . 



Boston vs. Washington 

New York vs. Philadelphia ... 

Boston vs. New. York 

St. Louie vs. Kansas City 

Philadelphia vs. Washington, 
Detroit ve. Chicago 



St. Louis vs. Kansas City 

Philadelphia vs. Washington 



Boston ve. New York 

•* Detroit. ..- 

Washington vs. St. Louis... 
New York vs. Kansas City. 
Philadelphia va. Chicago, . . 



Philadelphia 

Chicago 

Kaneae City 

Washington, 

New York.. 

BoBton , 

Chicago , 

Tie .., 

Detroit , 

it 

St. Louis , 

New York . . , 
Washington,. 

Detroit , 

Kansas City. 

Boston 

Chicago . 

Tie. 

Chicago 

u 

<t 
New York..] 

Detroit 

Philadelphia. 
Washington.. 

Chicago 

Detro t 

New York... 

Tie 

Chicago 

Washington.. 

Tie 

St. Louis 

Washington.. 
New York... 

Boston 

St. Louis 

Philadelphia. 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Kansas City. 
Philadelphia. 

Boston 

it 

Washington.. 

Tie 

Philadelphia. 



S3 
SO 



4 

14 
9 
4 

10 
4 
1 
3 

13 
9 
5 
6 
5 

14 
7 
5 
4 

1 
7 
4 

16 
4 
3 

10 

11 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 1886. 



95 



record of championship gAmes — Continued, 



Date 

1886. 



Sepi 



t.2? 



NAMES OP CONTESTANTS. 



Winning Club 



Runs 

Scored. 



Oct. 



Philadelphia vs. Chicago 'Tie 

New York vs. Kansas City New York... 

Boston ve. Detroit......... i Detroit 

Washington vs. St. Louie Washington. . 

" " ' St. Louis 

New York vs. Kansas City , New York. . . 

Philadelphia vs. Chicago ! Philadelphia. 



New York vs. Kansas City. 

Boston vs. Detroit 

Washington vs. St. Louis . . . 

" Chicago.... 

Philadelphia vs. St. Louis.. 

BoBton vs. KansaB City 

New York vs. Detroit 



Boston vs. Kansas City. 
Philadelphia vs. St. Louie. 



New York.. . 

Detroit 

Tie 

Chicago 

St. Louis 

Boston 
New York... 

Detroit 

BoBton 

Philadelphia. 



Washington vs . Chicago Chicago 



Philadelphia vs. St. Louis j Philadelphia. 

Boston vs. Kansas City BoBton 

New York vs, Detroit Detroit 

" Chicago | Chicago 

Boston vs. St. Louis 

Philadelphia vs. Kansas City 

Washington vs. Detroit 

New York vs. Chicago. 

Boston vs. St. Louis 

Philadelphia va. Kansas City 

Washington vs. Detroit 



Boston. 
Philadelphia. 

Detroit 

New York... 

Boston 

Philadelphia. 
Detroit 



Philadelphia vs. Kansas City. 

Boston vs. St. Louis 

New York vs. Chicago 

Philadelphia vs. Detroit 

Washington vs. Kansas City. 

Boston vs. Chicago 

New York vs. St. Louis 



Washington vs. Kansas City. 

Philadelphia vs. Detroit 

Boston vs. Chicago 



Philadelphia vs. Detroit. 



New York vs. St. Louis 

Washington vs. Kansas City 



Tie 

Boston 

New York... 
Tie 

Washington. , 

Chicago 

New York... 

Ti* '..'. 

Detroit 

Boston. 

Chicago 

Philadelphia. 
■< 

New York... 
Washington.. 
Kansas City. 



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To Base Bali, Players. 



Twelve years ago we issued a notice to Base Ball Players, announcing: 
that we had engaged in the business of furnishing" Base Ball Supplies, and 
soliciting their patronage. That our efforts to furnish satisfactory imple- 
ments and paraphernalia have met with success, is evidenced by the re- 
markable increase in our business since that time. Having been for ten 
years prior to that date intimately identified with the game, we had 
acquired a practical knowledge of the wants of ball players; and it has 
always been our aim, instead of flooding the market with cheap, worthless 
goods that might please the trade but displease the player, to manufacture 
and sell articles of genuine merit only, and such as would give the most 
perfect satisfaction to players. With our practical experience in the game 
and being the largest manufacturers of everything that is necessary in the 
base ball player's outfit, we are now in position to anticipate the wants of 
players, and furnish a better grade of goods than any other house in 
the trade. 

Manufacturers who have no reputation to sustain are continually 
offering inferior goodSi which are readily sought after by the average 
dealers in base ball supplies, who, not being acquainted with the practical 
wants of players, are apt to regard only the low prices, and not the 
quality of the goods. It is our constant endeavcr to manufacture only the 
very best goods, and to sell them at fair prices. Our well known trade- 
mark can be found on every article we manufacture In the base ball line, 
and is a guarantee of its quality. 

As our business is largely by mail, we urge upon our patrons 
the importance of writing plainly the names of their town, county and 
State; and in order to save return expresscharges on money, to accompany 
their orders with draft, posteffice order, express money order, or currency 
for the amount due. In all cases where the goods are not satisfactory and 
exactly as represented by us, they may be returned, and the money will be 
refunded. We desire to sell all the goods we can, but we wish also to do 
more than this, and that is to please our customers in every instance. The 
established reputation of our goods, and the record we have made by 
the fair and liberal treatment of our customers, is the best guarantee that 
can be offered for the future. 

With our two stores, in Chicago and New York, we are enabled to supply 
our customers more promptly than any other house in the trade. We 
carry duplicate and complete lines at both places, and our Eastern custom- 
ers can order direct from our New York house,, while the Western 
trade will be supplied from Chicago, or orders may be sent to any of our 
Depots of Supplies or Local Agencies, as may suit the convenience of 
the purchaser. 



CHICAGO 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS, m 



YORK. 



UNIFORM DEPARTMENT. 



AUR facilities for manufacturing Base Ball and all kinds 
^ of Athletic Clothing and Uniforms are the very best. 
These departments are under the supervision of experienced 
men, who are expert in designing and making Base Ball 
Uniforms. We would urge Clubs in their own interests not 
to make the mistake of intrusting their uniforms to local 
dealers, whose experience in this kind of work is necessarily 
limited, but profit by the experience and experiments of the 
fading professional clubs in the country, and send your orders 
direct to headquarters, and get a stylish and satisfactory outfit 
at a fair price. 

Our Mr. J, W. Spalding has recently returned from Europe, 
where he selected a very large assortment of English flannels, 
which, with the special line of American flannels that are 
made exclusively for us, we are prepared to make Base Bali 
and Athletic Uniforms that cannot be equaled in America. 

Self Measurement Blanks and Illustrated Price List of 
Uniforms furnished free upon application. Send ice. to cover 
postage for Samples of Flannel and Belt Webbing, and receive 
a handsome engraved fashion plate, showing the different 
styles and prices. We can furnish complete Uniforms from 
$5.00 to $30.00 per man. It is impossible to give a complete 
price list in the "Guide,*' but will outline in a general way 
the average cost of complete Uniforms; mostly in use by 
Base Ball Clubs. 

No. Uniform, consisting of Shirt, Pants, Stockings, 

Cap, Belt and Necktie, without Shoes. . .each, $12 50 

" 1 Uniform, same articles as above *' 10 00 

"2 «' " u " i( 7 50 

" 3 « " » " « 5 co 

M 4 n u m (< ti <> cq 

Extra for Padded Pants, from 75c. to $1.50 per pair. 

Prices and full information for Self Measurement furnished 
upon application. 

Correspondence from clubs and individuals solicited. 

Special attention will be paid this season to the manufacture 
of cheap suits for Boys. 

Chicago. A. 6. SPALDING & BROS. new york, 




COMPLETE UNIFORMS. 




STYLE u, 



STYLE C. — — ~ 

BASE BALL UNIFORMS. 

Our line of Flannels for Base Ball Uniforms consists of five qualities 
and over forty different patterns. Each grade is kept up to the highest 

f>omt of excellence, and the patterns are changed every year. We will 
e»ve nothing undone to maintain our reputation in this department, and 
base tail players are assured that, no matter which grade of uniform is 
selected, it will be the very best that can be furnished for the money. 

NO. O UNIFORM. 

NO. O. Best Quality League or Association Club Uniform. 
The flannel used in this uniform is manufactured exclusively for us, and 
which we have used for the past six years. For the durability of the 
material and superiority of the styles and workmanship, we refer to all 
clubs who have used our uniforms. We have made uniforms for the 
following leading clubs in 

THE LEAGUE— New York, Chicago, Boston, Detroit, 
Washington, Indianapolis, Pittsburgh. 

THE ASSOCIATION— St. Louis, Brooklyn, Cincinnati, 
Metropolitan, Louisville, Cleveland. 
And for the majority of the clubs of the N. E. League, International 
League, Southern League, Western League, N. W. League and others. 
We nave fifteen different styles or colors as follows: No. i, White; No. 2, 
Light Blue, mixed; No. 3, Stone Drab, mixed; No. 4, Brown, mixed; 
No. 5, Steel Gray; No. 6, White, narrow green stripe; No. 7, White, narrow 
blue stripe; No. S, Gray, large blue check; No. 9, Light Drab; No. 10, 
White, blue and red cross bars; No. n, Dark Brown; No. 12, Navy Blue; 
No. 13, Maroon; No t 14, Royal Blue; No. 15, Old Gold. 

CHICAGO. A. G. SPALDING & BROS, NEWVORK, 



BASE BALL UNIFORMS-Continued. 

No. o. Quality Shirts, any style Each, $5 00 

" o. " Pants, " . •« 450 

" o. " Stockings..., *' 1 50 

" o. " Caps *• 100 

** 00 or Belt ... '* 50 

Necktie to match trimmings. — — - 

Uniform complete w.'.thout Shoes , $13 50 

Extra for Padded Pants Each pair, 1 50 

NO. 1 UNIFORM. 

NO. 1 Uniform. The flannel used in this uniform is the same quality 
as the No. o grade, but lighter in weight. We have fifteen styles and colors 
as follows: No. i6 t While; No. 17, Yale Gray; No. iS, Drab, mixed; No. 
jq, Shaker Gray; No. 20, Steel, mixed; No. 21, Navy Blue; No. 22, Dark 
Brown; No, 23, Maroon; No. 24, Royal Blue; No. 25, Old Gold; No. 26, 
Scarlet; No. 2*7, Green; No. 2S, Light Brown; No. 29, Dark Gray; No. 30, 
Light Gray. 

PRICE. 

No. 1. Quality Shirt, any style. ..Each, $4 01 

" 1. ** Pants, " " 375 

*' 1. H Stockings " 1 oc 

" 1st «■ Caps ■« 7' 

" or 2 «■ Belt " 5c 

Necktie to match trimmings. 

Uniform complete without shoes $ 10 or 

Extra for Padded Pants Each pair, 1 5& 

NO. 2 UNIFORM. 

NO. 3 Uniform. Made of 4^ oz. twilled flannel in the following 
colors: No. 31, White; No. 32, Yale Gray; No. 33, Shaker Gray; No. 34, 
Steel, mixed; No. 35, Navy Blue. 

PRICE. 

No. 2. Quality Shirt, any style Each, $3 00 

" 2. " Pants, " «« 275 

f< 2, " Stockings » 75 

14 2d " Caps " 60 

" 1 or 3 " Belt » 40 

Necktie to match trimmings. 

Uniform complete without Shoes • $7 50 

Extra for Padded Pants , Each pair, 1 50 

NO. 3 UNIFORM. 

NO. 3 Uniform. Made of three colors of flannel—White, Gray, Navy 
Blue. Heavy and strong. The best value at the price. 

PRICE. 

No. 3, Quality Shirt, any style . Each. $2 00 

J' 3. "Pants, J « J « 175 

3. " Stockings « so 

3- " Caps << 5 o 

" 3 °r 4 " Belt " 25 

Uniform complete without Shoes $5 00 

Extra for Padded Pants Each pair, 1 00 

wapo. A. 6. SPALDING & BROS, new york. 



^ 



Spalding's Special Hand Made 

KANGAROO BALL SHOE 



Professional Players. 




ivl 



No. 2-O f - - - Price, 87.00. 

WE now have on the third floor of our New York Store a thoroughly 
equipped Shoe Factory for the manufacture of fine Base Bali and 
Athletic Shoes. This department of our business is under the immediate 
charge and supervision of Wm. Dowling, who for several years past has 
enjoyed the reputation of being the leading maker of Athletic Shoes in 
New York. We employ in this department the most skilful workmen, and 
use only the very best material and are prepared to take special orders and 
make a special last for profi ssional players. 

The special attention of Ball players is called to our new genuine 
Kangaroo Base Ball Shoe, which will be used this coming season by 
the Chicago, New York, Detroit, <ind other prominent League p'ayers. 

The above cut represents this Shoe, which is made from selected 
genuine Kangaroo skin, all hand sewed, slipper heel, cut low in front, and 
wide, so they can be laced tight or loose as the player likes. 

Each pair is provided with alligator laces, and the whole Shoe made 
with reference to comfort and the hard usage required of it. 

Our new Hand Forged Shoe Plates— for toe and heel— will be riveted 
on when required, without additional expense. 

HOW TO MEASURE. 

MEASUREMENT BLANKS will be 
furnishel on application, or a player can 
take a piece of manila paper of sufficient 
size, and by following the directions 
herein given, can take his own measure: 
PI ice the foot fiat on the paper, and 
with a i encil draw around the foot close 
to it. Then tike other measures as shown 
RANKLE i n the cut. 

LEFT FOOT. 
Ankle .. Inches. 

LHEEL JlKKl h 

y /%^ INSTBP b^lL P ' • ■ " 

Ball Ball Players will bear in 

mind that we make a special 

last for each mm, which 

_^ will be kept for future use. 

.v^S^^^S Satisfaction both as to fit and 

^ quality of shoe guaranteed. 

Chicago. A. G. SPALDING & BROS, new york. 




k 



THE OFFICIAL 



Spalding League Ball. 

ADOPTED BY THE NATIONAL LEAGUE FOR 1888. 




NO. 1. SPALDING'S OFFICIAL LEAGUE BALL, To Clubs, 

as adopted by the National League for ten consecu- Each. Per Doz, 
tive years, including iSSS; each ball wrapped in tin 
foil and put up in a separate box as represented in 
the above illustration, and sealed in accordance with 
the latest League regulations. Warranted to last 
a full game without ripping or losing its elasticity 
or. shape. Beware of Counterfeits; none 
genuine without trade mark on each box and ball.. $1 BO $15 00 

If you cannot obtain this ball from your local dealer, send $1.50 to us, and 
we will send it to you prepaid. 



CHICAGO 



i A. 6. SPALDING & BROS. ess. 



YORK. 



SPALDING'S 



Official League Ball. 



Spalding's League Rail is now recognized as the Standard in every 
part of the world where Base Ball is played. It was first introduced in 
1S76, and made under specifications designed by A. G. Spalding, whose long 
connection with the game had given him a knowledge of the requirements 
of a first-class ball not possessed by any other manufacturer. Every pains 
was taken with its manufacture, and it soon became very popular among 
professional plavers on account of its uniformity, elasticity and durability, 
which resulted in its being adopted as the official ball of the National 
League in iS^S, and has been re-adopted every year since by the leading 
associations, including 18SS. 

_ The large sale and great demand for this ball has brought out many 
imitators, who would pirate on our trade and reputation by offering an 
inferior article at a lower price, and endeavor to create the impression that 
these inferior low grade balls are the same, or are equal to Spalding's 
Official League. We would caution ball players against infringements, 
and urge them not to be misled by the misrepresentations of dealers whose 
increased profits on the cheap goods may have something to do with their 
statements. 

Our League Ball can be obtained of anv first-class dealer in base ball 
Supplies, to whom a liberal trade discount is allowed. 

The following Base Ball Leagues and Associations have adopted the 
Spalding League Ball as the Official Ball of their associations for 1SS8, and 
by their regulations, all championship games played during the season, 
this ball MUST be used: 

THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 

THE NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE. 

THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION. 
THE EA8TEBN LEAGUE. 

THE WESTERN ASSOCIATION. 

THE AMERICAN COLLEGE ABSOCIAT'N. 
THE NORTHWESTERN COLLEGE ASSOCIAT'N. 
THE NEW YORK INTER-STATE COLLEGE ASS'N. 
OHIO LEAGUE. CENTRAL LEAGUE. 



We refer with considerable pride to the following Resolution unani- 
mously adopted at the recent annual meeting of the American College 
Association, held at Springfield, Mass.: 

"Rr solved, That the American College Association in unanimously 
adopting Spalding's League Ball for all championship games, express their 
great satisfaction which this ball gave the Association last year, and also 
cheerfully indorse it as the best ball they have ever used/* 



CHICAGO 



s A. 6. SPALDING & BROS. u» 



YORK. 



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